Week 5

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PART 2: FUTURE

Week 5: Innovations in Pedagogy (Methods) and Assessment
Begins 10:00 am EST -0500 on February 24, 2014
Ends 9:59 am EST -0500 on March 3, 2014
Peer Assessment 3, Part 1, will be available until 9:59 am EST -0500 on March 3, 2014
Week 5 quiz will be available until 9:59 am EDT -0400 on March 10, 2014
Materials will be available until September 1, 2014

Summary:

This focus of this week is on innovations in pedagogy and assessment--because how you teach is what you teach, and what you count is what you value. We continue with three innovations on pedagogy and two on assessment: 
 
4) Make! From Critical Thinking to Creative Contribution. We’ll focus here on John Dewey and the idea of thinking, then doing, then thinking again.   We will discuss how making can add to our activist toolkit; we’ll discuss ways that an idea can be intrinsically important--and how it can also be important in influencing change in the world.   We’ll focus too on iteration as a key principle of the ever-changing World Wide Web:  an idea is not an end product but a process, and that iteration--publish first, edit later--helps you to be bold, to try new things, to experiment, change, and innovate.  Gaining feedback to make things better is a far superior goal than working to get a great score on some end-of-grade test or entrance exam.   
5) Encourage Students to Lead. Two of our “texts” in this class are student-created: DukeSurprise.com andField Notes for 21st Century Literacies (Available in print or on HASTAC. Annotate it on RapGenius!).  For "Duke Surprise," undergraduate students took the course being taught by Professors Cathy Davidson and Dan Ariely, "Surprise Endings:  Social Science and Literature," and created their own open course content and remixed it for general, public viewing and learning. In  Field Notes for 21st Century Literacies, graduate students from Duke University, University of North Carolina, and North Carolina State University opted to write a book together rather than write conventional research papers.  Their book is about how to do project-based, collaborative, peer learning.   They published it on Github where it can be remixed, on RapGenius where it can be annotated, and hastac.org where anyone can leave a comment.  The intent is not to be definitive but open to forking and mashup by others.
6) Make Diversity Your Operating System.  HASTAC's motto is "Difference is not our deficit; it's our operating system."  We will look at the model of John Hope Franklin (1915-2009), the eminent historian and civil rights activist.  Dr. Franklin said:  “My challenge was to weave into the study of American history enough of a presence of blacks so the story of the United States could be told accurately.”   How can learning and education be “accurate”?  And how can the international representation in our Coursera course add new dimensions to diversity and difference?  Does it make a difference to have participants who come from different cultures, countries, and traditions, with different disciplinary backgrounds, and of all different ages?  How does the international participation change this course and our sense of the history and the future of higher education?
 
7) Assessment: Make Sure What We Value is What We Count.  In Week 2, we talked about "How We Measure."   In this unit we go further to focus on the difference between summative and formative testing, and especially the world-wide dependence on high stakes summative testing which, the research shows, is a very weak assessment system for evaluating future success--and exceptionally poor at motivating engaged, curious learning.   No Child Left Behind (the U.S. national policy) and other high-stakes testing encourages "teaching to the test."  In the world beyond school, this form of learning is something to get past, to put behind one, rather than something to build on.  That's a tragedy.  What other, better forms of testing can we use that actually challenge and inspire learning?  Key point:  testing in real time is a good motivator.  High stakes end-of-term testing is the opposite.

8) Demonstrate Mastery of Content by Performance, not Testing.  We will here introduce the work of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Digital Media and Learning Initiative, and focus on the concept of  “connected learning” and alternative ways of using formative assessment to help build new pathways through new avenues of knowledge perhaps outside of established school curriculums, specifically by the use of digital badges.  

 

 


  Week 5 Assigned Reading:
The articles below are readings that support this week's lesson.  For more information on specific topics, check out the Supplementary Readings page. 

  • Surprise Endings course: dukesurprise.com
  • Davidson, Christina C. "Open for Whom?: Designing for Inclusion, Navigating the Digital Divide." Field Notes to 21st Century Literacies:  A Guide to New Theories, Methods, and Practices for Open Peer Teaching and Learning. 2013.  Available in  print or on HASTAC. Annotate it on  RapGenius !  

Video Lectures: 
The video lectures for this week consist of the following:  

  • Lecture 5.1 - Intro to Pedagogy and Assessment 
  • Lecture 5.2 - 4) Make! From Critical Thinking to Creative Contribution (Pedagogy)
  • Lecture 5.3 - 5) Encourage Students to Lead (Pedagogy)
  • Lecture 5.4 - 6) Make Diversity Our Operating System (Pedagogy)
  • Lecture 5.5 - 7) Make Sure What We Value is What We Count and 8) Demonstrate Mastery of Content by Performance, not Testing (Assessment)
  • Interview with Akili Lee and Sheryl Grant 

Convert these times to your time zone
   
  Office Hours:
The FutureEd team--Professor Davidson, Teaching Staff, Teaching Assistants and Community TAs-- will be available in the forums to answer your questions at certain times during the week. Please note that all of these times are in Eastern Standard Time -0500. See all available office hour forums. Here are the specific times for this week:

  • Monday, February 24, 7:30 - 8:30 am EST (-5:00 GMT) - Community TA
  • Monday, February 24, 12:30 - 1:30 pm EST (-5:00 GMT) - Community TA
  • Monday, February 24, 4:00 - 5:00 pm EST (-5:00 GMT) - Professor Davidson and Kaysi Holman
  • Wednesday, February 26, 7:30 - 8:30 am EST (-5:00 GMT) - Community TA
  • Wednesday, February 26, 10:00 - 11:30 am EST (-5:00 GMT)- Teaching Assistant: Malina
  • Thursday, February 27, 3:30 - 5:00 pm - Teaching Assistant: Malina
  • Friday, February 28, 10:00 - 11:00 am EST (-5:00 GMT) - Community TA

  Weekly Quiz:  
Take the weekly quiz.  Week 5 quiz will be available until 9:59 am EST -5:00 on March 10, 2014.  Note, the quiz is optional, however, if you wish to receive a Statement of Accomplishment you must receive 70% or greater across all quizzes.  Refer back to the Course Policies  page for more details.   

I have long been a critic of high-stakes, end-of-grade ("summative") standardized testing.  The research confirms that the best kind of testing happens often, as you are learning, and as a way to reinforce what you are learning.  We are making every effort to take the simple quiz format in Coursera and make it as valuable a learning tool as possible.  Thus, even though we ask for the best answer in the quizzes, we never give you false or wrong information.  That way, everything you read in the process of finding the best answer also reinforces sound information or ideas in the learning research. 

 Participatory Assignments:  

 

 

  • Designing Higher Education from Scratch: The students in Professor Davidson's face-to-face course (aka your community TAs) will post in the Coursera forums their first draft of some basic, preliminary ideas for their collaborative project on designing higher education from scratch. Please comment on their projects, and remember Professor Davidson's rule: No sympathy for trolls. Your comments should be respectful, helpful, courteous, and also remember that not everyone comes from the same background or has the same proficiency with the English language. 
  • Create a powerful video: Any time between now and the end of the course (9:59 am EDT -0400 on March 10), make a powerful two-minute video about a learning innovation or institutional change, post the video on Youtube or Vimeo, and post a link to your video into the forums. PLEASE READ BEFORE MAKING VIDEOS:  Digital literacy is also about privacy, intellectual property, identity, permission, translation.  Do you have permission to use images, data, graphs, and music? No video can be posted unless you have secured permission;  a downloadable permission form is available. If your video is not in English, how will you translate for our English-language-based community?
  • Forum topic on making diversity our operating system: How can learning and education be “accurate”?  And how can the international representation in our Coursera course add new dimensions to diversity and difference?  Does it make a difference to have participants who come from different cultures, countries, and traditions, with different disciplinary backgrounds, and of all different ages?  How does the international participation change this course and our sense of the history and the future of higher education? 

 Peer Assessment: 

 

There will be three peer assessment exercises throughout the course. If you wish to receive a Statement of Accomplishment with Distinction you must receive 70% or greater across all quizzes and participate in all three Peer Assessment exercises. Refer back to the Course Policies page for more details.
 
This week, you will start the third and final Peer Assessment exercise: Design Higher Education from Scratch. You will have one week (until 9:59 am EST -0500 on March 3, 2014) to write a 500-1000 word essay about building a university or other institution of higher education. What would be the mission statement, including the three most important values or skills that students take with them when they graduate? How do you structure the institution around those principles (e.g., courses, assessments, faculty, etc.)? Be sure to indicate how these reflect what you’ve learned in the course. Some questions for thought: Who are the teachers? Who are the students? What are the admissions criteria? Who pays and how much? How do the courses meet? What are the assessments? What constitutes mastery of content? Are there diplomas?  
 
Next week (from 10:00 am EST -0500 on March 3, 2014 to 9:59 am EDT -0400 on March 10, 2014), you will be given five essays that others have written and you will be responsible for peer reviewing those essays. Your feedback will be guided by quantitative and qualitative assessment rubric.

When giving feedback on peer work, remember Professor Davidson's rule: No trolls allowed in this course!  Your comments should be respectful, helpful, courteous, and also remember that not everyone comes from the same background or has the same proficiency with the English language. 

Created Wed 30 Oct 2013 6:01 AM PDT
Last Modified Wed 5 Feb 2014 8:23 AM PST 

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