Bernadette Guthrie

Personal Information

First name: 
Bernadette
Last name: 
Guthrie
Brief Bio: 

Bernadette Guthrie is the most recent recipient of the Joseph F. Martino Lectureship in Undergraduate Teaching. Her dissertation, Untimely Interference: Anachronistic Temporalities in Nineteenth-Century British Poetry, which she defended in the summer of 2015, argues that nineteenth-century British poetry was paradoxically shaped through its marking of the absence of pre-modern understandings of subjectivity, nature, and knowledge. Her work has appeared in New Literary History. 

Full Bio: 

Bernadette Guthrie is the most recent recipient of the Joseph F. Martino Lectureship in Undergraduate Teaching. Her research and teaching focus on nineteenth-century British poetry and prose, critical theory, the relationship between literature, religion, and secularization, and the interconnection between technology and knowledge production.

 

Her dissertation, Untimely Interference: Anachronistic Temporalities in Nineteenth-Century British Poetry, which she defended in the summer of 2015, challenges long-standing narratives of nineteenth-century poetry in general, and Romantic poetry in particular, as representative of a progressive modernization and secularization of pre-modern, religiously-inflected understandings of subjectivity, nature, and knowledge. Untimely Interference contends that pre-modern social forms paradoxically subsisted as powerful and disruptive forces in the nineteenth century in and through their haunting absence; specifically, the project examines how poems by William Wordsworth, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and Gerard Manley Hopkins are shaped by their varied ways of marking the absence of these social forms. Untimely Interference concludes by linking the historical situation of nineteenth-century British poetry to the present “obsolescence” of the humanities. By attending to present reading practices in the humanities, especially the computer-aided practices explored by the digital humanities, Untimely Interference argues that these practices allow the discipline to press against the “epochal” temporality of modernity and towards a relationship to literary history that embraces what Alan Liu has termed the “unknown within the known.”

Bernadette is the recipient of two teaching awards from Cornell’s Knight Institute for Writing in the Disciplines and has served as a co-facilitator for the Knight Institute’s pedagogy course for new writing teachers. In the 2014-15 academic year, she served as a HASTAC (Humanities, Arts, Sciences, and Technology Alliance and Collaboratory) scholar. Her work has been presented at NASSR and ACLA, among other conferences.  Her article “Invoking Derrida: Specters of Presence in Film and Print” appeared in New Literary History.

Social Media Profiles

Twitter Handle: 
myunnaturalself

Recent Content

 Conversations in Digital Humanities at Cornell University--Matthew Pritchard: “New scholarly frontiers: exploring the uses of digitized glacier photographs from the Cornell archives (1896-1911),

Conversations in Digital Humanities at Cornell University--Matthew Pritchard: “New scholarly frontiers: exploring the uses of digitized glacier photographs from the Cornell archives (1896-1911),

April 28 2015
Event
Fro m the Conversations in Digital Humanities website: Cornell professors Matthew Pritchard and Aaron Sachs will discuss their recent project to digitize and provide access to historical photographs from Cornell Professor Ralph Stockton Tarr’s 1848-1911 expeditions to glaciated areas in Greenland...
United States

Workshop at Cornell University Library: "Visualize Your Writing!": An introduction to basic algorithmic text analysis.

November 12 2014
Event
Part of the Conversations in Digital Humanities series. From the Conversations in Digital Humanities website: Take a break and drop by Olin 702, bringing whatever text you’re writing or reading, in digital format. We’ll set you up to run algorithmic analyses of your work using simple tools. Stick...
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY 14850
United States

Talk by Hoyt Long, "Literary Pattern Recognition: A Machine Reading of Modernist Form," part of Cornell University's Conversations in Digital Humanities Series

November 5 2014
Event
From the Conversations in the Digital Humanities website: Hoyt Long ’s research and teaching interests include modern Japanese literature, regional and subnational literatures, publishing history, environmental history and criticism, media theory, and digital humanities. His first book, On Uneven...
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY
United States

Workshop at Cornell University Library: "Visualize Your Writing!": An introduction to basic algorithmic text analysis.

November 12 2014
Event
Part of the Conversations in Digital Humanities series. From the Conversations in Digital Humanities website: Take a break and drop by Olin 702, bringing whatever text you’re writing or reading, in digital format. We’ll set you up to run algorithmic analyses of your work using simple tools. Stick...
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY 14850
United States

Workshop at Cornell University Library: "Visualize Your Writing!": An introduction to basic algorithmic text analysis.

November 12 2014
Event
Part of the Conversations in Digital Humanities series. From the Conversations in Digital Humanities website: Take a break and drop by Olin 702, bringing whatever text you’re writing or reading, in digital format. We’ll set you up to run algorithmic analyses of your work using simple tools. Stick...
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY 14850
United States

Workshop at Cornell University Library: "Visualize Your Writing!": An introduction to basic algorithmic text analysis.

November 12 2014
Event
Part of the Conversations in Digital Humanities series. From the Conversations in Digital Humanities website: Take a break and drop by Olin 702, bringing whatever text you’re writing or reading, in digital format. We’ll set you up to run algorithmic analyses of your work using simple tools. Stick...
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY 14850
United States

Talk by Hoyt Long, "Literary Pattern Recognition: A Machine Reading of Modernist Form," part of Cornell University's Conversations in Digital Humanities Series

November 5 2014
Event
From the Conversations in the Digital Humanities website: Hoyt Long ’s research and teaching interests include modern Japanese literature, regional and subnational literatures, publishing history, environmental history and criticism, media theory, and digital humanities. His first book, On Uneven...
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY
United States

Talk by Hoyt Long, "Literary Pattern Recognition: A Machine Reading of Modernist Form," part of Cornell University's Conversations in Digital Humanities Series

November 5 2014
Event
From the Conversations in the Digital Humanities website: Hoyt Long ’s research and teaching interests include modern Japanese literature, regional and subnational literatures, publishing history, environmental history and criticism, media theory, and digital humanities. His first book, On Uneven...
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY
United States

Talk by Hoyt Long, "Literary Pattern Recognition: A Machine Reading of Modernist Form," part of Cornell University's Conversations in Digital Humanities Series

November 5 2014
Event
From the Conversations in the Digital Humanities website: Hoyt Long ’s research and teaching interests include modern Japanese literature, regional and subnational literatures, publishing history, environmental history and criticism, media theory, and digital humanities. His first book, On Uneven...
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY
United States
Subscribe to This User's Most Recent Posts