IEEE Conference on Digital Ecosystems (IEEE DEST 2009) call for papers

Digital ecosystems occur through the interactions between both human and computer?based agents. As such Digital Ecosystems are an important research topic in the humanities, notably sociology and philosophy. Analysis of the role of human perception, engagement and expectation helps to understanding digital ecosystems as well as the operational dynamics of any specific system.

In turn the humanities themselves increasingly rely on digital ecosystems for their own research. In this viewpoint we study distributed service and resource environments for the humanities, e.g. service and resource networks, SOAs or grids that allow seamless integration on both the tool and the resource side. This includes research on how the humanities landscape is reshaped through Digital Ecosystems.

We solicit research and best practice papers on both facets of eHumanities. Submissions will undergo a rigorous review and accepted papers will be published in the IEEE Digital Library. The special session is complemented by two tutorials on ?Data ecosystems ? Repositories in Digital Ecosystems? and ?TextGrid?, the leading German Digital Ecosystem in the humanities.

 


Conference information:

Conference: IEEE Conference on Digital Ecosystems
Date: May 31st (tutorials) and June 1st?3rd, 2009
Deadline for full paper submission: **February 28th, 2009**
Paper acceptance notifications: March 15th, 2009
Location: Istanbul, Turkey
Venue: Harbiye Military Museum
Conference homepage: http://dest2009.debii.curtin.edu.au/

 


Special Session on eHumanities: Abstract

Digital ecosystems occur through the interactions between both human and computer?based agents, operating in a manner that creates both relationships of cooperation and conflict within the system as well as the overall system itself. As such Digital Ecosystems are an important research topic in the humanities, notably sociology and philosophy. Analysis of the role of human perception, engagement and expectation is critical to understanding the complexity of digital ecosystems as well as the operational dynamics of any specific system. This includes research on the broader relationship of technology and society, with particular reference to the cultures and politics of society?s adoption of, and adaptation to, new forms of technologically mediated communication and information sharing and of technology?s requirements to adapt to existing cultural semiotic processes.

Secondly, the humanities themselves increasingly rely on digital ecosystems for their own research. In this viewpoint we study standards?based, interoperable distributed service and resource environments, e.g. service and resource networks, SOAs or grids that allow seamless integration on both the tool and the resource side. Connected to this is this second direction in which ?intelligent? interactive expertise networks might be developed to solve the problems of knowledge?based distributed collaboration between experts and those who draw on their expertise. A ?networks of interactive knowledge? approach can be usefully applied to scholarly collaboration, as well as other situations in which people need to collaborate through exchanges of partial knowledge so that they might construct a collective expertise greater than the sum of its individual parts.

This research is largely being pursued through individual research projects involving the development of theoretical knowledge to guide further practical development, or deeper understandings of previous technological developments, though in the future these projects can link together to form a larger digital eco?system of systems. To foster such cooperation is a major long?term goal of the track and the related tutorials.

Special Session chair: Brief Biography

Marc Küster is Professor for XML technologies and Web Services at the department for Computer Science at the University for Applied Sciences in Worms, Germany. He holds a diploma in physics and a master in literary studies and history and has long worked at the crossroads of IT and philology. His doctoral thesis Geordnetes Weltbild deals with the cultural history of alphabetic ordering from its beginnings to present day treatment in computer systems. He leads the Worms team in the TextGrid consortium on grid?based tools for TEI?encoded editions, dictionaries and corpora and is in particular interested in interoperability issues and the application of the digital ecosystem paradigm in the humanities. He chairs the CEN/TC304 "European Localization Requirements", the CEN/ISSS Cultural Diversity Focus Group (CDFG) and serves on various national, European and international standardization committees.

5

No comments