Charles Warren Center Multimedia History and Literature Faculty Fellowship for 2014-15 - Applications Due Jan.15, 2014

Wednesday, January 15, 2014 (All day)

 

Multimedia History and Literature: New Directions in Scholarly Design

Workshop for 2014-15

The 2014-15 Charles Warren Center Seminar seeks applications for a year-long workshop on the analysis and presentation of multimedia history and literature. The digital revolution presents challenges and opportunities to customary ways of conducting research, presenting findings, storytelling, and reading.  Likewise, the widespread availability of media recording technology enables text, oration, graphics, objects, and even embodied performance to supplement, or even to constitute entirely, new forms of scholarly and artistic production.  Historical scholarship can now include open-ended and multiform engagements—interactive and continually updating databases, cartographic applications that enrich places with historical information, online dialogues with peers and the public, in addition to films and television programs, audio shows, and public performances.  The labor of literary critics and fiction writers has similarly expanded in scope, yielding possibilities that include, for instance, the restructuring of literary anthologies, of the shape and form of the novel, of literary magazines, and of the circulation of short fiction and poetry.  Multimedia scholarship thus invites us to reconsider how history and literature have been, could be, and should be represented. 

What are the virtues and limitations of the new multimedia environments?  Do changes of medium transform approaches to chronology, space, genre, characterization, and plotting?  As electronic archives have enhanced the accessibility of historical source material, how have they changed our notions of what constitutes an archive in the first place?  How are historians and fiction writers employing modes of production beyond print?  By addressing these broad questions, among others, the seminar seeks to explore new models for the design of historical and literary scholarship.

Postdoctoral fellows will participate in a seminar led by Vincent Brown (Departments of History and African and African American Studies) and Glenda Carpio (Departments of English and African and African American Studies). The seminar will be organized around presentations by the fellows as well as invited speakers.  Our major goal will be to illustrate and assess the ways that historians, literary critics and fiction writers can employ modes of production beyond print.  Applicants may come from any field in the humanities or social sciences that might be relevant to this general concern.  Moreover, given the particular interest of the seminar conveners, we encourage applicants with an interest in African and African American Studies.  The seminar will be accompanied by a graduate course, which will be open to undergraduates by faculty permission.

Applicants may not be degree candidates and should have a Ph.D. or equivalent.  (Typically these are faculty fellowships, though may be held by those without a tenure-track position.  These fellowships do not carry benefits, while the Center’s Global American Studies postdoc is benefited.)  Fellows have library privileges and an office which they must use for at least the 9-month academic year.  We especially seek applicants who embrace the challenges of forging scholarly conversations across disciplines.  And the Center encourages applications, otherwise consistent with the Workshop theme, relating to the nation’s life during and as a consequence of wars, and from qualified applicants who can contribute, through their research and service, to the diversity and excellence of the Harvard community.  Stipends: individually determined according to fellow needs and Center resources, up to a maximum of $54,000. 

Apply at http://academicpositions.harvard.edu/postings/4882 no later than December 16, 2013, with recommendation letters due January, 15, 2014. Decisions conveyed in early March.

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