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Pedagogy Project: Shopdrop a mini-zine

Note: This was my lesson plan for the first in a 5-part workshop I did for a class on community writing. You can find more over at my blog, taxomania.org.

By way of an introduction to the grit of zine-making, we're going to try to make a mini-zine in under 60 minutes. We'll exchange these zines in class and it will be up to each of you to distribute these zines by way of shop-dropping (AKA droplifting), a form of culture jamming. You'll be able to drop your zines and others in a number of places on campus or in Syracuse.

1. What's a zine?

Let's let nicki sabalu help us answer that.

2. Can I see some examples?

Yes! Let's spend 10 minutes looking at some I've collected over the last year or so [you can get these from places like Atomic Books in Baltimore or Quimby's in Chicago]. As you browse these in groups of four, consider some of these questions:

  • How would you describe the variety of these zines in terms of form (that is the way they are put together) versus their content (that is, what their rhetorical goals are)?
  • Who is the implied audience for the zine? Who are its readers?
  • Think about the different processes these makers used envision, collect, and circulate their zines.

3. How do I make a zine?

We'll make zines throughout the next few Mondays, but for today we're going to take a stab at making a mini-zine. We can thank Sassyfrass Circus for helping us with this.

minizine

Take 30 minutes to follow the instructions above. In terms of content, think about the various places and audiences this zine might travel to. Or imply a specific space (i.e. the library) with your content.

4. Copy and distribute!

If we have time today, we'll copy, fold, and cut these in class. Next, we'll exchange them in class and discuss potential places for distribution. If we run out of time, we'll bump this to next week's workshop.

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