Blog Post

Digital Humanities and the Disciplines - Conference

For those of you in the NY/NJ/PA area, I encourage you to come participate/attend a conference on "Digital Humanities and the Disciplines," which beginsthe afternoon of Thurs. Oct. 2 and continues for most of the day onFriday, Oct. 3.  

This conference is run by Rutgers' own Center for Cultural Analysis. Their aim in this conference is to assess the currentstate of the Digital Humanities and to plot the future of thisburgeoning set of practices and inquiries, both here at Rutgers and inthe scholarly community at large.

You can find the schedule here: http://cca.rutgers.edu/events/conferences/ and copied, below.

We've asked six innovators in the field to speak to the ways in whichnew media have (and have not) changed business as usual in their homedisciplines, and to reflect on how new media resources and tools mighttransform interdisciplinary scholarship.  Each of the speakers has donegroundbreaking work of one kind or another.  Dan Cohen's Center forHistory and New Media has developed a number of terrific tools, such asthe citation-manager Zotero (http://chnm.gmu.edu/index.php);Hilary Ballon has redesigned the flagship journal for architecturalhistorians (JSAH) so as to take full advantage of the multimediacapacity of the internet;  Chris Kelty has published an important newbook on the Free and Open Source Software movement, is part of thecollective behind the excellent anthropology blog "Savage Minds" (http://savageminds.org/)and has recently joined with a number of other scholars to challengethe American Anthropological Association to embrace open access;  GregCrane was part of the early move by classicists to embrace new mediaand continues to direct the Perseus Digital Library (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/);  Martha Nell Smith was the founding director of the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (http://www.mith.umd.edu/), and continues to produce innovative web-based scholarly editions (http://www.mith.umd.edu/mnsmith/);  David Jaffee has been a leader in the development of new media resources for the teaching of U.S. history.

Each of the talks should involve "show and tell" components;  each willalso allow for significant discussion from the floor.  We'll hold areception for our speakers outside the Alexander Library 4th Floorteleconference center after the second talk on Thurs. evening, and willconclude the conference with a roundtable on Friday afternoon.

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http://cca.rutgers.edu/events/conferences/

Th/F Oct. 2/3     Digital Humanities and the Disciplines Symposium

Thursday, October 2

4:30 pm Introduction
Meredith McGill, Director, Center for Cultural Analysis
Douglas Greenberg, Executive Dean School of Arts and Sciences, Rutgers University

4:45 pm Dan Cohen, "New Directions in Digital History"
Associate Professor, Department of History and Art History Director, Center for History and New Media George Mason University

5:45 pm Hilary Ballon, "Rethinking the Journal in Multimedia"
Associate Vice Chancellor, New York University

Friday, October 3

10:00 am Breakfast/Coffee

10:30 am Chris Kelty, "Two Bits: The Cultural Significance of Free Software"
Associate Professor of Information Studies, Center for Society and Genetics, UCLA

11:30 am Gregory Crane, "Cyberinfrastructure and Cultural Heritage"
Professor of Classics, Tufts University

12:30 pm Break

1:45 pm Martha Nell Smith, "Enclaves: Perils and Possibilities"
Professor of English, Founding Director, Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities, University of Maryland

2:45 pm David Jaffee, "Thinking Visually with Historians: The Challenge of New Media for History"
Professor, Bard Graduate Center

4:00 pm Roundtable Discussion
Moderated by Meredith McGill

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1 comment

Manuel, Thanks for posting; sounds like a great event! We'd love it if you and other attendees are able to share your thoughts on blogs here at HASTAC, whether in liveblogs or summary posts after the event.

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