Blog Post

Jacque's hello

I'm delighted that this workshop is taking place. I'm a digital literary scholar and I teach at Scripps College in Claremont, CA. My areas of general interest are feminisms and technology, data and narrative, and early modern literature and culture. I'm affiliated with several intercollegiate groups here in Claremont: Science, Technology, and Society; Media Studies; and Gender and Women's Studies. I recently hosted THATCamp Feminisms West and have been working on issues around feminist technologies in DH for five years or so. I first started that work while the project manager at the Women Writers Project. Recently, I've been a part of the FemTechNet group and have been thinking about both southland and feminist DH community building.

We've been sprinting to the end of the term and I have a sick little one, so I'm not sure yet what piece I'll be bringing to this workshop. I have several in the hopper. I'm looking forward to the group discussion and work!

Jacque

updated goals:

 

I'd like to get two things out of the workshop - first, an expanded sense of a feminist DH community and second, some feedback on a pilot project that we're developing here in Claremont. A bonus third would be some conversation about methods for moving from literature to algorithm to tactile object - more on that below.

For the first goal - in addition to having the chance to interact with more of you, I'd be most happy to be a part of a discussion about how to continue to foster these networks after the workshop ends.

For the second - we are developing a project based on the photographic, ethnographic, and musicological work of Edward S. Curtis. Curtis spent 30 years in the early 20th century working to record what he described as the "vanishing race." Scholars have been relatively critical of Curtis' project - the North American tribes that he documents still exist and his narrative of vanishing takes part in a larger cultural narrative that pretends as if Native Americans no longer inhabit the US. As early documentary, his project has also been subject to the demythologizing of the genre. We are working to develop a digital resource and teaching tools that help us reconsider the place of Curtis' work - not to 'recuperate,' but to develop a more nuanced view of the kinds of ethnographic work that he undertook and to try to understand the role of his subjects in the creation of their visual and audio narratives. We also want to be able to leverage our own holdings of the photos to help students see that the people photographed are far from 'vansihed'. This is project that is entirely outside my areas of expertise as an early modernist. I'm the lead in terms of being a DH specialist, but I'm not an area specialist and I'd love to have feedback on the project proposal (coming) from those who might be more well versed in 20th century america and photographic technology.

The third is where my heart really lies - I have a research student who is working with me to see what it would mean to take a poem, transform (deform) it into an alogorithm, and then into a 3D object. We are doing this in an entirely exploratory way and I'd be happy to be in touch with anyone who works on elit or more artistic genres of scholarship.

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5 comments

Welcome to the workshop, Jacque.  It sounds like you have a lot of neat projects going on.  I'm familiar with THATCamp, but didn't know there was a feminist version of the unconference.  Would you mind telling us more and/or sharing a link?

Also, I'm sorry to hear about the little one.  I hope he/she gets to feeling better soon. :)

Lori Beth 

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We actually held three coordinated feminist THATCamps - West, East, South. The idea originated out of conversations here in LA/Southland and we were delighted to have others join in with their own local event. #tooFEW was a feature of the event that took on an even more distributed character. We had a great turn out and a good deal of virtual participation as well. I'm sorry you didn't hear about beforehand Lori Beth!

 

Here's the links to the three different sites: 

feminismswest2013.thatcamp.org

http://feminismssouth2013.thatcamp.org/

http://feminismseast2013.thatcamp.org/

 

I wrote a couple recap pieces - including this one with links to other blogs etc during the event

http://jwernimont.wordpress.com/2013/03/16/resourcesshort/

Jacque

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Hi Jacque,

These are awesome resources.  Would you mind sharing them on the workshop Google doc of resources and materials?  This way can we archive them for future reference.

Also, you'll have to let me know when the next conference comes around so I can put aside funds to attend!

Lori Beth 

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I'd like to get two things out of the workshop - first, an expanded sense of a feminist DH community and second, some feedback on a pilot project that we're developing here in Claremont. A bonus third would be some conversation about methods for moving from literature to algorithm to tactile object - more on that below.

For the first goal - in addition to having the chance to interact with more of you, I'd be most happy to be a part of a discussion about how to continue to foster these networks after the workshop ends.

For the second - we are developing a project based on the photographic, ethnographic, and musicological work of Edward S. Curtis. Curtis spent 30 years in the early 20th century working to record what he described as the "vanishing race." Scholars have been relatively critical of Curtis' project - the North American tribes that he documents still exist and his narrative of vanishing takes part in a larger cultural narrative that pretends as if Native Americans no longer inhabit the US. As early documentary, his project has also been subject to the demythologizing of the genre. We are working to develop a digital resource and teaching tools that help us reconsider the place of Curtis' work - not to 'recuperate,' but to develop a more nuanced view of the kinds of ethnographic work that he undertook and to try to understand the role of his subjects in the creation of their visual and audio narratives. We also want to be able to leverage our own holdings of the photos to help students see that the people photographed are far from 'vansihed'. This is project that is entirely outside my areas of expertise as an early modernist. I'm the lead in terms of being a DH specialist, but I'm not an area specialist and I'd love to have feedback on the project proposal (coming) from those who might be more well versed in 20th century america and photographic technology.

The third is where my heart really lies - I have a research student who is working with me to see what it would mean to take a poem, transform (deform) it into an alogorithm, and then into a 3D object. We are doing this in an entirely exploratory way and I'd be happy to be in touch with anyone who works on elit or more artistic genres of scholarship.

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I'd like to get two things out of the workshop - first, an expanded sense of a feminist DH community and second, some feedback on a pilot project that we're developing here in Claremont. A bonus third would be some conversation about methods for moving from literature to algorithm to tactile object - more on that below.

For the first goal - in addition to having the chance to interact with more of you, I'd be most happy to be a part of a discussion about how to continue to foster these networks after the workshop ends.

For the second - we are developing a project based on the photographic, ethnographic, and musicological work of Edward S. Curtis. Curtis spent 30 years in the early 20th century working to record what he described as the "vanishing race." Scholars have been relatively critical of Curtis' project - the North American tribes that he documents still exist and his narrative of vanishing takes part in a larger cultural narrative that pretends as if Native Americans no longer inhabit the US. As early documentary, his project has also been subject to the demythologizing of the genre. We are working to develop a digital resource and teaching tools that help us reconsider the place of Curtis' work - not to 'recuperate,' but to develop a more nuanced view of the kinds of ethnographic work that he undertook and to try to understand the role of his subjects in the creation of their visual and audio narratives. We also want to be able to leverage our own holdings of the photos to help students see that the people photographed are far from 'vansihed'. This is project that is entirely outside my areas of expertise as an early modernist. I'm the lead in terms of being a DH specialist, but I'm not an area specialist and I'd love to have feedback on the project proposal (coming) from those who might be more well versed in 20th century america and photographic technology.

The third is where my heart really lies - I have a research student who is working with me to see what it would mean to take a poem, transform (deform) it into an alogorithm, and then into a 3D object. We are doing this in an entirely exploratory way and I'd be happy to be in touch with anyone who works on elit or more artistic genres of scholarship.

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