Blog Post

Conferencing in the Digital Humanities

For me, one of the most enjoyable aspects of being a graduate student is having the opportunity to attend a diversity of conferences. My interests span pedagogy, educational assessment, the digital humanities, and cultural studies; almost nothing makes me feel like I'm more a part of these fields than does the opportunity to attend conferences and encounter the cutting edge research being conducted around the country.

Typically, the greatest problems I encounter with conferences are ones of choice: Where should I attend? With so many great options, this is usually a pleasant problem to have. Imagine my surprise, then, when the two conferences I most wanted to attend this year -- HASTAC and Computers and Writing -- were scheduled to occur at the same time, albeit many, many miles apart.

Which should I attend? How should I decide?

A quick search of the HASTAC.org website reveals a history of interest not only in the HASTAC conference, but also -- to a lesser, but still notable extent -- in the Computers and Writing conference which, in 2015, conflicted directly with HASTAC. (For examples, see https://www.hastac.org/opportunities/cfp-computers-and-writing-conference-2013-mechanization-and-writing and https://www.hastac.org/groups/hastac-2015-conference-group)

Clearly, these is some interest within HASTAC.org for both the HASTAC conference, and also related conferences like Computers and Writing. I wonder, then: Has anyone else found themselves divided about which conference to attend this year? Has anyone, in the past, encountered a similar dilemma about how to proceed with conference attendance? Or, if you attended one of the two conferences this year, did you find any innovative way(s) to virtually attend or engage with the other conference?

Share you stories and ideas in the comments below!

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