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New book project: Life in Code and Software

New book project: Life in Code and Software

Announcing an exciting new book project - the topic is relevant to many of you on HASTAC. For more information on the themes below, see our amazing Critical Code Studies forum (and its companion Code Critiques), and Living Mediations: Biology, Technology and Art

 

 

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LIFE IN CODE AND SOFTWARE: Mediated Life in a Complex Computational Ecology

Edited by David M. Berry

http://www.livingbooksaboutlife.org/books/Life_in_Code_and_Software

 

Open Humanities Press is pleased to announce the publication of Life in Code and Software, the 23rd book in its open access Living Books About Life series.

The essays in this collection, edited by David M. Berry, Senior Lecturer in Digital Media in the Department of Political and Cultural Studies at Swansea University, explore the relationship between living, code and software. For Berry, technologies of code and software increasingly make up an important part of our urban environment - indeed, their reach stretches to even quite remote areas of the world. Life in Code and Software introduces and explores the way in which code and software are becoming the conditions of possibility for human living, crucially forming a computational ecology, made up of disparate software ecologies we inhabit. As such we need to take account of this new computational environment, Berry argues, and think about how today we live in a highly mediated, code-based world - a world where computational concepts and ideas are foundational, and within which, code and software become the paradigmatic forms of knowing and doing.

ISBN: 978-1-60785-283-4
edited by David M. Berry

Table of Contents

Video clips and current PDF of the book is available at the original site

Introduction: What is Code and Software?
This book explores the relationship between living, code and software. Technologies of code and software increasingly make up an important part of our urban environment. Indeed, their reach stretches to even quite remote areas of the world. Life in Code and Software introduces and explores the way in which code and software are becoming the conditions of possibility for human living, crucially forming a computational ecology, made up of disparate software ecologies, that we inhabit. As such we need to take account of this new computational environment and think about how today we live in a highly mediated, code-based world. That is, we live in a world where computational concepts and ideas are foundational, or ontological, which I call computationality, and within which, code and software become the paradigmatic forms of knowing and doing. Such that other candidates for this role, such as: air, the economy, evolution, the environment, satellites, etc., are understood and explained through computational concepts and categories. (more...)

Thinking Software

Eric W. Weisstein - What is a Turing Machine?
David Barker-Plummer - Turing Machines
Achim Jung - A Short Introduction to the Lambda Calculus
Luciana Parisi & Stamatia Portanova - Soft Thought (in architecture and choreography)
David M. Berry - Understanding Digital Humanities
Edsger W. Dijkstra - Go To Statement Considered Harmful
Alan M. Turing - Computing Machinery and Intelligence
Martin Gardner - The Fantastic Combinations of John Conway's New Solitaire Game 'Life'
David Golumbia - Computation, Gender, and Human Thinking
Alan M. Turing - Extract from On Computable Numbers, with an Application to the Entscheidungs Problem
Video of a Turing Machine - Overview
Kevin Slavin - How Algorithms Shape Our World


Code Literacy ('iteracy')

David M. Berry - Iteracy: Reading, Writing and Running Code
Ian Bogost - Procedural Literacy: Problem Solving with Programming, Systems, & Play
Cathy Davidson - Why We Need a 4th R: Reading, wRiting, aRithmetic, algoRithms
Jeannette M. Wing - Computational Thinking
Stephan Ramsay - On Building
Edsger W. Dijkstra - On the Cruelty of Really Teaching Computing Science
Louis McCallum and Davy Smith - Show Us Your Screens
A short documentary about live coding practise by Louis McCallum and Davy Smith
Jeannette M. Wing - Computational Thinking and Thinking About Computing'
why the lucky stiff - Hackety Hack: Learning to Code

 

Decoding Code

David M. Berry - A Contribution Towards a Grammar of Code
Mark C. Marino - Critical Code Studies
Lev Manovich - Software Takes Command
Dennis G. Jerz - Somewhere Nearby is Colossal Cave: Examining Will Crowther's Original "Adventure" in Code and in Kentucky
Aleksandr Matrosov, Eugene Rodionov, David Harley, and Juraj Malcho, J. - Stuxnet Under the Microscope
Ralph Langner - Cracking Stuxnet, a 21st-century Cyber Weapon
Stephen Ramsay - Algorithms are Thoughts, Chainsaws are Tools
Wendy Chun - Critical Code Studies
Federica Frabetti - Critical Code Studies
David M. Berry - Thinking Software: Realtime Streams and Knowledge in the Digital Age

 

Software Ecologies

Gabriella Coleman - The Anthropology of Hackers
Felix Guattari - The Three Ecologies
Robert Kitchin - The Programmable City
Bruno Latour - The Whole is Always Smaller Than Its Parts- A Digital Test of Gabriel Tarde’s Monads
Mathew Fuller and Sonia Matos - Feral Computing: From Ubiquitous Calculation to Wild Interactions
Jussi Parikka - Media Ecologies and Imaginary Media: Transversal Expansions, Contractions, and Foldings
David Gelernter - Time to Start Taking the Internet Seriously
Adrian Mackenzie - The Problem of Computer Code: Leviathan or Common Power?
Adrian Mackenzie - Wirelessness as Experience of Transition
Thomas Goetz - Harnessing the Power of Feedback Loops
Christian Ulrik Andersen & Søren Pold - The Scripted Spaces of Urban Ubiquitous Computing: The Experience, Poetics, and Politics of Public Scripted Space
B.J. Fogg, Gregory Cuellar, and David Danielson - Motivating, Influencing, and Persuading Users
Alexander R. Galloway - "Deleuze and Computers"
Gary Wolf - The Quantified Self
Gary Kovacs - Tracking the Trackers
Michael Najjar - How Art Envisions Our Future

 

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LIVING BOOKS ABOUT LIFE

Living Books About Life was launched by Open Humanities Press (OHP) (http://openhumanitiespress.org) in October 2011.

Funded by the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC), and edited by Gary Hall, Joanna Zylinska and Clare Birchall, Living Books About Life is a series of curated, open access books about life -- with life understood both philosophically and biologically -- which provide a bridge between the humanities and the sciences. Produced by a globally-distributed network of writers and editors, the books in the series repackage existing open access science research by clustering it around selected topics whose unifying theme is life: e.g., air, agriculture, bioethics, cosmetic surgery, electronic waste, energy, neurology and pharmacology.

Peter Suber, Open Access Project Director, Public Knowledge, said: ‘This book series would not be possible without open access. On the author side, it takes splendid advantage of the freedom to reuse and repurpose open-access research articles. On the other side, it passes on that freedom to readers. In between, the editors made intelligent selections and wrote original introductions, enhancing each article by placing it in the new context of an ambitious, integrated understanding of life, drawing equally from the sciences and humanities’.

By initially creating twenty one ‘living books about life’ in just seven months, the series represents an exciting new model for publishing, in a sustainable, low-cost, low-tech manner, many more such books in the future. These books can be freely shared with other academic and non-academic institutions and individuals.

Nicholas Mirzoeff, Professor of Media, Culture and Communication at New York University, commented: ‘This remarkable series transforms the humble Reader into a living form, while breaking down the conceptual barrier between the humanities and the sciences in a time when scholars and activists of all kinds have taken the understanding of life to be central. Brilliant in its simplicity and concept, this series is a leap towards an exciting new future’.

One of the most important aspects of the Living Books About Life series is the impact it has had on the attitudes of the researchers taking part, changing their views on open access and raising awareness of issues around publishers’ licensing and copyright agreements. Many have become open access advocates themselves, keen to disseminate this model among their own scholarly and student communities. As Professor Erica Fudge of the University of Strathclyde and co-editor of the living book on Veterinary Science, put it, ‘I am now evangelical about making work publicly available, and am really encouraging colleagues to put things out there’.

These ‘books about life’ are themselves ‘living’, in the sense they are open to ongoing collaborative processes of writing, editing, updating, remixing and commenting by readers. As well as repackaging open access science research -- together with interactive maps and audio-visual material -- into a series of books, Living Books About Life is thus involved in rethinking ‘the book’ itself as a living, collaborative endeavour in the age of open science, open education, open data, and e-book readers such as Kindle and the iPad.

Tara McPherson, editor of VECTORS, Journal of Culture and Technology in a Dynamic Vernacular, said: ‘It is no hyperbole to say that this series will help us reimagine everything we think we know about academic publishing. It points to a future that is interdisciplinary, open access, and expansive.’

Funded by JISC, Living Books About Life is a collaboration between Open Humanities Press and three academic institutions, Coventry University, Goldsmiths, University of London, and the University of Kent.

 

Books in the series:

* Astrobiology and the Search for Life on Mars, edited by Sarah Kember (Goldsmiths, University of London)

* Bioethics™: Life, Politics, Economics, edited by Joanna Zylinska (Goldsmiths, University of London)

* Biosemiotics: Nature, Culture, Science, Semiosis, edited by Wendy Wheeler (London Metropolitan University)

* Cognition and Decision in Non-Human Biological Organisms, edited by Steven Shaviro (Wayne State University)

* Cosmetic Surgery: Medicine, Culture, Beauty, edited by Bernadette Wegenstein (Johns Hopkins University)

* Creative Evolution: Natural Selection and the Urge to Remix, edited by Mark Amerika (University of Colorado at Boulder)

* Digitize Me, Visualize Me, Search Me: Open Science and its Discontents, edited by Gary Hall (Coventry University)

* Energy Connections: Living Forces in Creative Inter/Intra-Action, edited by Manuela Rossini (td-net for Transdisciplinary Research, Switzerland)

* Extinction, edited by Claire Colebrook (Penn State University)

* Human Genomics: From Hypothetical Genes to Biodigital Materialisations, edited by Kate O’Riordan (Sussex University)

* Medianatures: The Materiality of Information Technology and Electronic Waste, edited by Jussi Parikka (Winchester School of Art, University of Southampton)

* Nerves of Perception: Motor and Sensory Experience in Neuroscience, edited by Anna Munster (University of New South Wales)

* Neurofutures, edited by Timothy Lenoir (Duke University)

* Partial Life, edited by Oron Catts and Ionat Zurr (SymbioticA, University of Western Australia)

* Pharmacology, edited by Dave Boothroyd (University of Kent)

* Symbiosis, edited by Janneke Adema and Pete Woodbridge (Coventry University)

* Another Technoscience is Possible: Agricultural Lessons for the Posthumanities, edited by Gabriela Mendez Cota (Goldsmiths, University of London)

* The In/visible, edited by Clare Birchall (University of Kent)

* The Life of Air: Dwelling, Communicating, Manipulating, edited by Monika Bakke (University of Poznan)

* The Mediations of Consciousness, edited by Alberto López Cuenca (Universidad de las Américas, Puebla)

* Ubiquitous Surveillance, edited by David Parry (University of Texas at Dallas)

* Veterinary Science: Animals, Humans and Health, edited by Erica Fudge (Strathclyde University) and Clare Palmer (Texas A&M University)

 

Contact the Living Books about Life series editors:

Gary Hall, Joanna Zylinska and Clare Birchall

E: gary.hall@coventry.ac.uk

E: j.zylinska@gold.ac.uk

E: c.s.birchall@kent.ac.uk

W: http://www.livingbooksaboutlife.org

 

Open Humanities Press is a non-profit, international Open Access publishing collective specializing in critical and cultural theory. OHP was formed by academics to overcome the current crisis in scholarly publishing that threatens intellectual freedom and academic rigor worldwide. OHP journals are academically certified by OHP’s independent board of international scholars. All OHP publications are peer-reviewed, published under open access licenses, and freely and immediately available online at http://openhumanitiespress.org.

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1 comment

Anonymous (not verified)

The topic is relevant to many of you on HASTAC. For more information on the themes below, see our amazing Critical Code.rare books for sale

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