Blog Post

Syllabus for History and Future of Higher Education

 

Updated Jan 14, 2014

 

ISIS  640/691

HISTORY AND FUTURE OF HIGHER EDUCATION

Duke University

Prof Cathy N. Davidson

#FutureEd

(First day of class: Jan 15, 2014)



Public Draft

Comments Welcome



“Changing the Way We Teach and Learn“

“Digital Literacy with a Maker Spirit”

“Learning to Make Better Lives”

“Diversity Isn’t Our Deficit.  It’s Our Operating System”



(Here’s how to leave a comment on a Google Doc:  Go to “insert” on the Toolbar and click on the drop down menu for “comments” and you can add ideas, suggestions, books, articles, and urls in the comment box that will open in the right hand margin.   For a brilliant demonstration, videos, and real life examples of how to work collaboratively in a Google Doc, go to PhD2Published)





Overview and rationale of the project:  “It’s Not a MOOC, It’s a Movement”



And a hilarious video about what it feels like to teach or be a student in a student-directed, peer-to-peer experimental class, by Prof Steven Berg, Schoolcraft College:  http://www.hastac.org/documents/what-it-sometimes-teachtake-student-centered-course




Winter 2014    (First class meeting of ISIS 640:  Jan 15, 2014)



Wednesdays, 3:20-7:00 pm (extended to 8 pm for MFA students)

Smith Warehouse Bay 4, C106, PhD Lab In Digital Knowledge



Office Hours Wed 2:00-3:00 pm  



SIGN UP SHEET FOR COLLABORATIVE PROJECT



Prof Cathy N. Davidson, John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies and Ruth F. DeVarney Professor of English; Co-Director, PhD Lab in Digital Knowledge, Duke University



  • This class is being taught collaboratively with Professors Christopher Newfield, English, University of California Santa Barbara, "English Majoring After College; or, Histories and Futures of Higher Education” (English 197) and with Professor David Palumbo-Liu, Comparative Literature, Stanford University, "Histories and Futures of Humanistic Education:  Culture and Crisis, Books and MOOCs" (English 265 and EDS 217x:  http://edf.stanford.edu/educ-217x).  NB: Stanford and UCSB are on a quarter system so they start earlier than Duke and end earlier; only some of our class times overlap.  See the syllabus for further details.    This kind of course has been dubbed a a DOCC: Distributed Open Collaborative Course, by FemTechNet which ran its DOCC in Fall 2013.  



  • We will meet with the Stanford and UCSB classes via Google Hangout several times during the semester, two of which will include Prof. Doris Sommer, creator of Harvard’s Cultural Agency Project and the Bay Area’s Howard Rheingold, author of NetSmart and many other works on technology, collaboration, and creativity.   





  • ISIS 640 will run at the same time as Prof Davidson’s six-week Coursera MOOC (starting January 27) on “History and Future of (Mostly) Higher Education” and that MOOC will be incorporated, linked, commented upon, and the subject of conversation, analysis, and experimentation in the face-to-face Duke Class.  Can a MOOC be interactive?  Can it be participatory?  Are there better ways the massive form can be used for the benefit of all (and not just for shareholders in for-profits?)  These are deep questions we will investigate together.  



  • The Chronicle of Higher Education will host a weekly blog about this whole initiative, written by students in ISIS 640, “Thoughts From a MOOC on Higher Education.”  Prof Davidson will be contributing to this blog and we can invite students and faculty from Stanford and UCSB to contribute as well.



________________________________________________________________________




COURSE DESCRIPTION



“The History and Future of Higher Education” uses an activist, purposive account of history to help shape an agenda for learning innovation, in the classroom, in our institutions, in society, and in everyday life and work.  It also uses an activist, purposive pedagogy so that students read theory and history and immediately apply it to actions, to public communications, and to a larger agenda of educational understanding and reform.  In method, as well as in content, we will be changing from “teaching” to “learning,” and will be rethinking a model of education as a top-down, output-oriented, product-oriented knowledge-delivery system.  Instead, we will be thinking about engaged learning, where the boundaries between theory and practice are blurred, where individual ideas are communicated to the largest possible audience, and where academics (students and faculty) take back a centrality that, too often, is given to administrators, policy makers, and corporate investors.  What is higher education for?  What is its purpose in our society and in other societies?   Why would anyone want to be a teacher in 2014?  And what should a student today expect from higher education and take responsibility for?   These are big questions that we will read about, discuss, communicate, and implement.



In ISIS 640, we will be looking specifically at ways that the apparatus, structure, and metrics of higher education that we’ve inherited were designed to train the ideal worker for the Taylorist Industrial Age.  Many of the most familiar features of higher education were designed roughly between 1865 and 1925 (from class rankings to majors, professional schools, graduate school, IQ tests, and multiple choice tests, including as part of college entrance requirements).  Which of those methods and metrics are working for us now?  Which are legacies that no longer serve their purpose--or ours?  And how can we work, together, to share our most innovative ideas in order to change our own pedagogies and practices (on an individual level) and how can we mobilize to help transform our institutions too?  How can we think critically about ideas touted as “innovative” (such as MOOCs, flipping the class, and other “disruptions”) that may or may not be truly innovative? What alternative models can we think about together?



METHOD:  “See one. Do one. Teach one. Share one.” In this class you, as students, won’t just be learning about legacies and innovations; you will be leading and experimenting and constantly critiquing innovative new pedagogies so that you can improve upon them and incorporate them into your own methods for learning and for teaching.   The method of this course is also the content we will be discussing.  You will be commenting on pedagogy in your blogs, and you will be proposing your own ideas and soliciting feedback from others (at Duke, at the co-located courses, and from the MOOC participants).  The idea is to work together to improve how we learn and what we learn, how we teach and what we teach.  In some ways this is a “meta MOOC”:  we’ll see if a MOOC can be turned into an open-learning collaborative peer-grading extravaganza--international, diverse (there are no admission requirements for MOOCs), massive.   Let’s challenge ourselves to make it meaningful too!



Why?  Because current catch phrases such as “flipping the classroom” make it seem as if it is easy to teach with technology.  It is not.  It is important, it can be creative and useful, but “flipping” is extremely labor intensive and we've just barely touched the surface of the deep thinking, practice, methods, and ideas of teaching with, through, by, for, and about technology in a critical, creative, interactive, empowering, and significant way.



The first half of the class will operate in synchronization with the Coursera online course and with co-located courses or Google Hangout class sessions conducted by some of the most prominent thinkers about new media and the state of the U.S. university, at Stanford, UC Santa Barbara, UC Berkeley, New School, and Harvard.  After Spring break, the focus shifts to a student-directed final collaborative project of designing higher education from scratch,” addressing very fundamental questions in your design.  To think big and bold, we’ll be considering Nelson Mandela’s famous description of his twenty-seven years in Robben Island Prison as “The University of the Struggle.”   Some of you might design vocational/technical universities, some arts-focused, some better versions of existing community colleges, private or public research universities.  The point is to really think what a university is for. (Please review and add to these  template questions to get you started.)



Grades will be offered by a combination of contract grading (described below) and peer-to-peer assessment of the contribution to the success of the final project.



It’s not just a MOOC.  It’s a movement.

________________________________________________________________________



COURSE REQUIREMENTS



Summary:

  1. MOOC and #FutureEd Community Wrangling:  1 week team commitment/

  2. Professional Blog for Chronicle of Higher Education:  500-1000 words, co-authored or individual; due at end of your MOOC week.

  3. Weekly Class Participation: Weekly required reading, class participation, written participatory experiments and exercises, commenting on hastac.org #FutureEd posts, and Google hangouts.

  4. Collaborative Final Project: Designing Higher Education from Scratch This is a second (different) team project.

  5. Optional:  Collaborate with Stanford and UCSB on  a #FutureEd project.  

  6. Final Portfolio: Aggregate all your work for the term in one place



*****

Details:



1. MOOC and #FutureEd Community Wrangling:

Students in the class will work in a team (2 or 3 students per team) responsible for one week of the Coursera MOOC as well as for guiding ISIS 640 class discussion for that week.  You will select a week, hold at least two office hours each, and organize and be responsible for some kind of participatory experience (Forum, Wiki, Timeline, etc).  You will work on building out appropriate collaborative resources on the hastac.org wiki designed for that purpose, and devise a communications plan for sharing your innovative ideas with the largest possible community.  You will be adding bibliography and ideas relevant to the topic covered that week.



You will be partners in an experiment to help all of us in higher education understand what we can learn, together, from our interactions with massive numbers of online learners who enter the MOOC without prerequisites and with various objectives (i.e. no one is in the  MOOC to earn a degree).  What does motivate people to take MOOCs?   What does this “new” form of learning mean--and what does it mean for traditional forms of education?  What and how can we learn together from this experiment? Can we make MOOCs participatory? Students in ISIS 640 will serve as “community wranglers” helping to guide and shape community participation in a three-part wiki that HASTAC is building for this Initiative: a crowdsourced resources/bibliography on the history and future of higher education; another for pedagogical innovation; and a third for institutional reforms, designs, strategies and initiatives worldwide. Weekly teams of community wranglers will be responsible for monitoring activity on the wikis and helping community members with formatting and editing.



The whole #FutureEd initiative is designed to spark an activist movement on behalf of peer learning,  innovative pedagogy, and various kinds of engagement with content, methods, and assessment techniques. Blogging about this experience will be part of the weekly endeavors and the communication/engagement aspect of the course.  

 

NB:  there are official TAs for the Coursera MOOC; ISIS 640 students will in no way be responsible for “grading” and monitoring the certificate functions of the Coursera course.





2. Professional Blog for Chronicle of Higher Education:

Students in the class will be responsible for filing twelve blog posts (500-1000 words) to the Chronicle of Higher Education about your experience on the MOOC, in class, in partnership with Stanford and UCSB, focusing on the topic of your MOOC week, delivered the Sunday following your week of MOOC responsibilities.  Schedule/Calendar to follow.  You will post your drafts to Google Doc for edits from the team and from the whole class before submitting a final version to CHE.   Some of you will be co-authoring the CHE posts since we have promised to deliver perfectly edited, proofread posts.  The CHE blog is an incredible professional opportunity--and a responsibility.  Students will coordinate posting deadlines and article content and then reblog the posts on the class website.  You will focus on the content, experiences, and innovations you champion during your designated MOOC week and will deliver the CHE piece at the end of that week.



3. Weekly Class Participation:

Reading, participation, and writing assignments must be finished on time, before each class, as indicated on the schedule below.  For some assignments, we will be putting work up on RapGenius and the assignment will be to annotate (in text, image, or sound) and to use social media to encourage others, including in the MOOC, to annotate too.  You will also be “community wranglers” on the #FutureEd initiative throughout the course, pro-actively finding ways to communicate beyond our course.  Students will be responsible for commenting on at least one post in the HASTAC #FutureEd group each week to help move the community conversation forward.  



4. Collaborative Final Project (40% of total grade):

Topic:    Design a model of higher education from scratch



Team:  We will be combining two of the weekly teams to make the one final project team focusing on designing a model of higher education from scratch.   We will do some adjustments of the teams for skill, personality, collaborative success in order that the final project teams have the greatest chance of success.  Probably (this may change) you will work in three teams of 4-6.   Your members should exemplify “collaboration by difference,” for the different skills, ability, perspectives, design expertise, computational, assessment, and leadership qualities they can lend to the project.



Method:  Design a website for your university--or propose another public interface for your project. View this template of questions to get started.  In other words, instead of writing about an ideal university of the future, you will be thinking it through and then presenting it to the world in some material form.  You might also want blueprints, maquettes, or other ways of modeling your university. You will post drafts of your design to RapGenius for feedback from the Coursera students and the general public.



T-Shirt:  We have funds for you to design and make your university t-shirt.  (Materializing the representation of your ideals and mission is part of the “maker” learning method of the course.)  This is optional--but there is no better way to get out a message quickly, effectively, potentially virally.  Think Creative.  



Purpose:  Real world impact. How can designing a model of higher learning have an impact on those responsible for designing classes and institutions in the real world?  What does a model do?  What does it address?  How do you get it to the widest audience in order to have the greatest impact?   What is your communication strategy? What is your goal? How will you accomplish that goal?  Try it.  How did it work?  Evaluate/assess your success.



5. Optional Cross-School Partnership:   

Anyone who wishes is encouraged to find ways to interact with and build collaborative projects with students in the Stanford and UCSB courses.  If you wish, you may invite participation by partnering schools in your Designing Higher Education from Scratch project.  This is optional and the design of the collaboration is entirely up to you (and your responsibility too). NB: It is possible your real-world impact will be greater with partners.



6. Final Portfolio:

In lieu of a final research paper or final exam, each of you will create your own portfolio (in a Google doc, a Word Press blog, or wherever you wish) that brings together all you have done this semester: links to all your blog posts, your CHE blogs, work summary of your contribution to the MOOC, annotations, tweets, or anything else you have contributed this term.  The final portfolio



FINAL EXAM:   None.  

FINAL PAPER:  None



________________________________________________________________________



GRADING AND ASSESSMENT METHODS

Final grades will be based on contract grading based on accomplishing the quantity of work you contract for, delivered at the highest possible standards of quality.   The standard of excellence on your class work is determined by obvious metrics (attendance, participation, communication, collaboration), standards of excellence discussed as a class and concretized in the community constitution that you will be working on together, and also by peer assessment of your contribution to the two team projects.  Distribution of grades is:  (a) 60% contract grade for your community wrangling, class participation, and CHE blog posts (as collected by you in your portfolio); and (b) 40% on success, as judged by peer-to-peer evaluation and peer-assessed contribution, of your University from Scratch.  



Contract Grade Requirements:  

4.0: Student completes (all assignments):

  • MOOC Community wrangling,

  • Chronicle of Higher Education professional blogging,

  • All weekly class participation assignments,

  • Collaborative project to designing higher education from scratch, and

  • Comprehensive final portfolio.



3.5: Student completes (all assignments except the MOOC wrangling):

  • Chronicle of Higher Education professional blogging,

  • All weekly class participation assignments,

  • Collaborative project to designing higher education from scratch, and

  • Comprehensive final portfolio.



3.0: Student completes (all assignments except the MOOC wrangling and CHE blogging):

  • All weekly class participation assignments,

  • Collaborative project to designing higher education from scratch, and

  • Comprehensive final portfolio.



2.5: Student completes (all assignments except the MOOC wrangling, CHE blogging and one week of class participation):

  • All but one weekly class participation assignments,

  • Collaborative project to designing higher education from scratch, and

  • Comprehensive final portfolio.



2.0: Student completes (all assignments except the MOOC wrangling, CHE blogging and two weeks of class participation):

  • All but two weekly class participation assignments,

  • Collaborative project to designing higher education from scratch, and

  • Comprehensive final portfolio.



Please Note:

Any student who fails to complete the University from Scratch team assignment (i.e. letting down your peers) or the Final Portfolio (of all your work for the term) will receive a failing grade for the course.



If any student commits to write a Chronicle of Higher Education blog and does not fulfill that commitment professionally and on time, there will be an automatic two full grade reduction.



Grading philosophy:  

We will discuss the philosophy behind contract grading in conjunction with Pasi Sahlberg’s Finnish Lessons and pp. 224-229 of Field Notes for 21st Century Literacies.  It is assumed that the writing and multimedia in the blogs, community wrangling, and designing higher education from scratch will be of graduate level (A grade) quality.  You all had to petition to be in the course and were selected because of what you can contribute to the group.   However, if you cannot contribute to everything, every week, please decide now and contract for a lesser amount of work.  



The standard will always be simple: the highest. There is no curve. And no class rank.  (Both forms of relativistic grading, as we will discover, are products of late 19th century Fordist ideas; they are not about intrinsic quality; i.e. I don’t care if my airplane is better than yours.  I want the best, safest airplane possible.)  The instructor and fellow classmates will give feedback if a blog or community participation or feedback falls below an acceptable standard of excellence.   The goal in the class is not to rank student performance or to give a certain percentage of 4.0 grades.  The goal (per Finnish Lessons) is to have every student achieve excellence, at whatever work load is contracted and planned from the outset.  



________________________________________________________________________



COLLABORATION (INSTITUTIONS AS MOBILIZING NETWORKS):



This course practices what it preaches in the sense that it is linked to a global movement on behalf of higher education and education reform. In The Future of Thinking, Davidson and Goldberg offered a new definition of “institutions” as “mobilizing networks,” in that, within even the most conservative institution, there are always small pockets and forces of change.  Learning how to leverage those and mobilize on behalf of change is part of the message and method of this course.   



Specifically, our course will pair with courses and/or with professors at a number of other institutions.  Built into our syllabus are onsite and online events with Professors Anne Balsamo (New School); Christopher Newfield (UC Santa Barbara); David Palumbo-Liu (Stanford), and Howard Rheingold (Stanford, UC Berkeley, and Rheingold U).  Please see the class schedule for the events and relevant readings.



_______________________________________________________________________



BOOKS LIST:



NB: all books by Prof Davidson are available free as open access pdfs



Balsamo, Anne. Designing Culture:  The Technological Imagination at Work. Duke University Press. 2011. Print.

Damasceno, Cristiane, Omar Daouk, Cathy N. Davidson, Christina C. Davidson, Jade E. Davis, Patrick Thomas Morgan, Barry Peddycord III, Elizabeth A. Pitts, and Jennifer Stratton. Field Notes to 21st Century Literacies:  A Guide to New Theories, Methods, and Practices for Open Peer Teaching and Learning. Print, HASTAC, RapGenius. 2013.

Davidson, Cathy N. and David Theo Goldberg. The Future of Thinking:  Learning Institutions in a Digital Age. MIT Press. 2009. Available online or in print.

Davidson, Cathy N. Now You See It:  How the Brain Science of Attention Will Transform the Way We Live, Work, and Learn. New York: Penguin Books. 2011. Print. (Up to 50,000 students enrolled in the “History and Future of (Mostly) Higher Education” Coursera course can download the pdf of this book for free, by arrangement with the publisher)

Newfield, Christopher. Unmaking the Public University:  The Forty Year Assault on the Middle Class. Harvard University Press. 2011. Print.

Palumbo-Liu, David. The Deliverance of Others:  Reading Literature in a Global Age. Duke University Press. 2012. Print.

Rheingold, Howard. Net Smart. MIT Press. 2012. Available online or in print.

Sahlberg, Pasi. Finnish Lessons:  What the World Can Learn from Educational Change in Finland. Teachers College Press. 2011. Print.

Wilder, Craig Steven. Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America’s Universities. New York: Bloomsbury Publishing. 2013. Print.



______________________________________________________________



CLASS SCHEDULE AND READINGS:



Please see the overview of class schedule.



Wednesday, January 15, 2014: First day of Class

We will also introduce the concept of this co-located class, principles for innovation (in the classroom and out, individually and institutionally).



We will work on distributing the Chronicle of Higher Education blog deadlines and also set up office hour schedules for the Coursera course and discuss responsibilities as “community managers” for the Coursera course.



We will have Coursera representatives join us to discuss the mechanics of running a MOOC.



We will also be setting up your accounts on the class Wordpress site, dukefutureed.com, so that you can all blog publicly.



Finally, we will focus on ways to maximize the collaboration with Stanford and UCSB graduate students.  The ideal is for all of you to leave this course with a network of other student leaders, thinkers, and educational activists.



Reading:

Davidson, Cathy N. “How a Class Becomes a Community: Theory, Method, Examples”. Field Notes to 21st Century Literacies:  A Guide to New Theories, Methods, and Practices for Open Peer Teaching and Learning. 2013. Print, HASTAC, RapGenius.

“Forum: A Bill of Rights and Principles for Learning in a Digital Age”. 2013. Online.



Supplemental Reading:

Burnam-Fink, Michael. “MOOCs Need to Go Back to Their Roots.” Future Tense. 2013. Online.

Mazzolini, Margaret.  “When to jump in: The role of  the instructor in online discussion forums,”

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0360131505000990    [Very useful data for instructors to absorb, useful for online and onsite discussions]

Rosenberg, Tina. “Turning Education Upside Down”. The New York Times. 2013. Online.

Sinnott-Armstrong, Walter. “10 Steps to Developing an Online Course.” Duke University. 2012. Online.

Westerfelt, Eric.  “The Online Education Revolution Drifts Off Course,” NPR, December 31, 2013.  Online.




Assignments:

(1) Draft the MOOC Community Constitution:

DUE DATE:  January 23, noon.  Must be posted to Coursera by January 27

Read the “21C Manifesto” on RapGenius including the text, visual, or audio annotations there and please add your own annotations as well.  Then, go to the Google doc version and transform this 21C Manifesto into a draft Community Constitution for the Coursera “History and Future of (Mostly) Higher Education.”  



Here’s a video on how to use  RapGenius: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XFLnBNWrIZU



What is a virtual class?  What is a collaborative class?  What rules pertain, what do not?

"Describe your experiences in this exercise.   On our class Wordpress site, please indicate how you annotated the 21C Manifesto on RapGenius, and discuss the changes you made to transform the 21C Manifesto for a face-to-face Duke graduate course into a draft Community Constitution for an online course for thousands of students.  Note when you changed it.  Did anyone change your modifications?  If you didn't make any annotations or change the Google doc, why not?



Once the Coursera course opens, the students will be invited to modify it through the Coursera wiki tool in a way that extends to their experience as a class.  We’ll then be inviting annotations on Rapgenius from a worldwide community.  On the course Wordpress site, let us know if anyone modified your annotations.  How? Why?



(2) Prepare questions for Professor Christopher Newfield

Before next week’s Google Hangout, everyone in class should contribute at least one question for Professor Newfield to a Google doc and vote on favorite questions and we’ll rank order those for the Google Hangout.

__________________________________________________________________________



REMINDER:  Draft of Community Constitution.  Due, January 23, noon.  Must be posted to Coursera by January 27.

__________________________________________________________________________

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Google Hangout featuring Professor Christopher Newfield, UCSB

Reading and discussion:  Unmaking the Public University



Reading:

Newfield, Christopher. Unmaking the Public University:  The Forty Year Assault on the Middle Class. Harvard University Press. 2011. Print.



Assignment:  

Before the Google Hangout, everyone in class should contribute at least one question for Professor Newfield to a Google doc and vote on favorite questions and we’ll rank order those for the Google Hangout.   



For next week (Jan 27), watch Week 1 of Coursera.  Help first MOOC group assemble the three wikis and get ready for the Forum.  Everyone should participate in the Forums in a modest way to help and get the hang of this scope (tens of thousands of students!)  



Supplementary reading:

Jeffrey J. Williams, “The Great Stratification,” Chronicle Review, December 2, 2013. Online.

Craig Watkins “Rethinking the Race Between Education and Technology Thesis,”  DML Central, December 2, 2013. Online.



In class project after Google Hang Out with Prof Newfield:

After the Google Hangout with UCSB and Stanford, we’ll begin with a “design sprint” exercise to start the semester off with the teams that will be working together on designing higher education from scratch project.  Objective:  For you to meet one another and form teams, guiding concepts for your final project.  (The project and even the constitutive groups may well change a lot during the term.)



Design Sprint (with lots of large post-it notes)  [Please see fuller description for February 19 below]

(1) What is your passion? The University of _____________

(2) What is the chief role/job description/function you will play at your university?

(3) What is a secondary area where you can be back up under someone else’s leadership?

(4) What key skills do you bring to this project? Some examples:   

  • Hand coding skills

  • Human computer interaction

  • Aesthetics, graphic design

  • WordPress Ninja

  • Github Ninja

  • Learning Research

  • Assessment Research, Consulting

  • Science Education

  • Humanities Education

  • Social Science Education

  • Arts Education

  • Movement, physical therapy, exercise, fitness, health etc education

  • Social and civic engagement

  • Network organizing and managing

  • Project management

  • Building models, maquettes, etc

  • So many other things----what are they??

__________________________________________________________________________



REMINDER:  Draft of Community Constitution.  Due, January 23, noon.  Must be posted to Coursera by January 27.



_________________________________________________________________________




Wednesday, January 29, 2014



Week 1 of the History and Future of (Mostly) Higher Education Coursera MOOC begins on Monday, January 27, 2014.



Reading:

Davidson, Cathy N. and David Theo Goldberg. The Future of Thinking:  Learning Institutions in a Digital Age. MIT Press. 2009. Available online or in print.

DML Research Hub. Connected Learning: Relevance, the 4th R. 2013. Online.



Supplementary Reading on “No Sympathy for the Trolls”:

Erard, Michael. “Four Ways to Improve the Culture of Commenting.” The New York Times. 2013. Online.

Wilder, Craig Steven. Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America’s Universities. New York: Bloomsbury Publishing. 2013. Online.



Supplementary on MOOCs and For Profit University (a parody) and Ivory Tower:

Ivory Tower,  http://filmguide.sundance.org/film/13946/ivory_tower  

YouTube Parody:   For Profit University:   



Assignments:

(1) Participate in Coursera “Week 1: Guiding Principles and Driving Concepts - Let’s Get Started”    Group 1 MOOC Wrangles and CHE Blogs.

  • Watch the videos

  • Participate in the Coursera forums for Week 1

  • Participate on the Coursera wiki for the Community Constitution. Coursera Wranglers will have primary responsibility for responding and participating; however, all students should make sure to pay attention and contribute (including some informal fact checking, etc.)  

  • Discuss your experience, ideas, and video in class.

 

Coursera week description:

This week introduces the idea of a purposive, activist history--learning how and why educational institutions were constructed in the past, for specific historical purposes and in specific contexts; and helps us understand the present and gives us some tools for beginning to shape a different future.  We will look at information revolutions from the cuneiform (the beginning of writing in Ancient Mesopotamia) to the World Wide Web.  Almost all of our current educational institutions--the apparatus, forms, and metrics--were created for the last Information Age, for Fordism and Tayloris, for the age of steam-powered presses, machine-made Paper, and machine-made ink. Pundits were alarmed back then, too, about distraction, shallowness, lack of values, attention, or the work ethic in the youth of the era--even about pedophiles preying on young girls giddy and defenseless from too much novel reading.   Looks at the “21st century literacies” we need now in an era where issues of privacy, publicity, security, access, cost, ethics, intellectual property, safety, credibility, collaboration, global consciousness, design, open learning, and ethics all need careful thinking and action.    



We will ask two recurring questions:  who’s behind the camera?  Education Is Social, Technology is Social.  Whose Labor Makes Our Learning Possible?   People, Institutions, Structures (Often Unacknowledged).  Who Are Our (Sometimes Hidden) Teachers?  How Do They Support Us?  How Do We Recognize Who They Are?  Which Are the Lessons That Last a Lifetime?  Why?



(2) Prepare questions for Professor Cathy Davidson

Before next week’s Google Hangout, everyone in class should contribute at least one question for Professor Davidson to a Google doc and vote on favorite questions and we’ll rank order those for the Google Hangout.



_____________________________________________________________________________________________________



Wednesday, February 5, 2014



Google Hangout featuring Cathy Davidson, Duke   

Discussion :  Now You See It, focus on Preface, Introduction, and Chapter 3, iPod Experiment



Week 2 of the History and Future of (Mostly) Higher Education Coursera MOOC begins on Monday, February 3, 2014.



Reading:

Davidson, Cathy N. “Introduction” and “Chapter 3. Project Classroom Makeover.” Now You See It:  How the Brain Science of Attention Will Transform the Way We Live, Work, and Learn. New York: Penguin Books. 2011. Print.

“Higher Education.” Wikipedia. Online.




Assignment:

(1) Participate in Coursera “Week 2: The iPod Experiment as Learning Model: Or, Learning vs. Education”   Group 2 MOOC Wrangles and CHE Blogs

  • Watch the videos

  • By February 10 at 10:00 am, participate in the Coursera wiki for the International Timeline of Higher Education; Coursera Wranglers will have primary responsibility for responding and participating; however, all students should make sure to pay attention and contribute (including some informal fact checking, etc.)  

  • Discuss

  • experience, ideas, and video in class.

 

Coursera week description:

Duke University’s iPod experiment became international news.   Why?  What happens when students are in charge?   What happens when education begins without knowing the answer (whether in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics--or STEM fields--or in the creative or performative arts, or in humanistic historical or critical thinking, curiosity and inductive logic should be inspiring learning).  The modern professional disciplinary form of education emphasizes, by contrast, content acquisition.   Why?  Survey of Western educational ideas from Socrates, to Descarte, Diderot, and Kant.  Looks at the Humboltian University (based on Friedrich Schleiemacher’s liberal ideas of importance: strict control & disciplines, from preservation of accepted knowledge to Advancement of New Knowledge) and French ideas of importance of certification, degrees, conformity of views, reputation, hierarchy of elite education. Looks at history of higher education in North America, from the University of Mexico (1551) to founding of first research university (Johns Hopkins University in 1876) to MOOCs. Keywords for the Industrial Age vs. Connected Age.  



___________________________________________________________________________________________________

Thursday, February 6, 2014:  Guest Lecture, Professor Anne Balsamo, Dean of the School of Media Studies, New School, NYC



Reading:

Balsamo, Anne. Designing Culture:  The Technological Imagination at Work. Duke University Press. 2011. Print.

FemTechNet, Transforming Higher Education with Distributed Open Collaborative Courses (DOCCs): Feminist Pedagogies and Networked Learning. 2013. Online.



Key Points of FemTechNet White Paper (from blog by Thelma Young, October 9, 2013):  

  1. Effective pedagogy reflects feminist principles: "Feminists often describe their classroom as collaborative, engaged, and interdisciplinary." By exploring how to bring these values further into higher education it will value not just feminist courses, but all fields could replicate and explore.



  1. Several currently existing reforms efforts do little to change the status quo: "MOOC efforts often represent a step backwards, by promulgating a standardization of format rather than a focus on processes that support global access to learning and the reciprocity of teaching and learning." FemTechNet has thought a lot about various ways to not leave disenfranchised isolated students out of the learning process.



  1. Access to technology does not guarantee access to knowledge, and respecting the investment of labor is critical to facilitating real learning: "The celebration of MOOCs discounts the financial and affective costs that they in fact require." There are broad structural implications of relying on technology to create reform. It's important to also think of wider social issues as well as the examine the full costs of MOOCs.



  1. Technoscientific choices are not values neutral, and building infrastructure is not simply about choosing components among corporate, consumer products: "Although universities often make large investments in hardware, building the infrastructure that we need in higher education actually involves rethinking traditional notions of ownership of property."



  1. The FemTechNet DOCC is an innovative experiment from which many stakeholders will learn: The DOCC 2013 is an experiment created by scholars in a wide number of fields and we hope that through a variety of assessment measures, not just numeric ones, we can learn best practices that could serve many people.



_________________________________________________________________________

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

“What if fortitude, not SAT scores, were our entrance exam at the university of the future?”  



Week 3 of the History and Future of (Mostly) Higher Education Coursera MOOC begins on Monday, February 10, 2014.



Reading:

Duke Surprise Endings. 2012. Dukesurprise.com (student-created online self-paced course)

Peddycord III, Barry and Elizabeth A. Pitts. “From Open Programming to Open Learning:  The Cathedral, the Bazaar, and the Open Classroom.” Field Notes to 21st Century Literacies:  A Guide to New Theories, Methods, and Practices for Open Peer Teaching and Learning. Print, HASTAC, RapGenius. 2013.

Davidson, Cathy N.  “How We Measure,” Now You See It:  How the Brain Science of Attention Will Transform the Way We Live, Work, and Learn. New York: Penguin Books. 2011. Print.

Sahlberg, Pasi. Finnish Lessons:  What the World Can Learn from Educational Change in Finland. Teachers College Press. 2011. Print.




Supplementary Readings:

Davidson, Cathy N. How to Moonwalk (And Why). 2013. Online.

“#Dazed93: The legacy of Linklater’s Dazed and Confused” Dazed Digital Magazine. 1993. Online.

de Lumier, Angier. How to Moonwalk Tutorial. 2006. Online.

Gellman, Barton. “Here’s how The Post covered the ‘grand social experiment’ of the Internet in 1988”. The Washington Post. 2013. Online.

Keller, Bill. “An Industry of Mediocrity,” New York Times,  October 27, 2013. Online.   (Here’s my response to this piece.  On your website, think about blogging your own.)  

Gellman, Barton. “Here’s how The Post covered the ‘grand social experiment’ of the Internet in 1988”. The Washington Post. 2013. Online.

“Education in Finland.” Wikipedia. Online.

“No bad schools only poorer neighbourhoods.” Yle Uutiset. 2013. Online.

Politizane. Wealth Inequality in America. 2012. Online.

“Who Pays Teachers Best for their Time?” Online.



Assignment:

Discussion of FemTechNet White Paper, DOCC, MOOCs, SPOC (Self-Paced Online Course), HASTAC Initiative (Massive Online and Face-to-Face Open Course).    Group 3 MOOC Wrangles and CHE Blogs



(1) Participate in Coursera “Week 3: Teaching Like It’s 1992”

  • Watch the videos

  • Watch the student-made videos on youtube about higher education; Community wranglers will help troubleshoot the video-posting process for Coursera students.

  • You are welcome to participate in the peer-review process by submitting an essay

  • Discuss your experience, ideas, and video in class.

 

Coursera week description:

The world changed on April 22, 1993, when a free World Wide Web browser called Mosaic 1.0, that made the Internet easy to use, was released by the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, while, at the same time, policy changes allowed more school, home, and business connections to the network. The combination gave the general public the ability to publish anything to anyone else online--without the intervention or safety net of an editor or publisher.  That’s a tremendous responsibility and opportunity that ushered in our Information Age.  We should be training students to be productive participants in this era.  We’re not.  We’re still teaching like it’s 1992. “Uneven Development” - Marx’s counter to idea of Linear Progress (“trickle down”).  Since SATs in 1926, high school acts as college prep. Erosion of alternative models (vocations). Filter and funnel - social mobility and education.  Outside of the classroom, we no longer learn the same way we did in 1992, but we’re still teaching like it’s 1992 inside the classroom. Focus on assessment methods, peer-to-peer open learning, new tools for data analysis (and precautions).    We’ll also look at what the thirty-year downward trend in public educational funding has meant in the U.S. and how it is altered the demographics of education for public and private schools and worldwide.   We’ll look at how higher education in the U.S. now accelerates rather than diminishes income inequality.  We’ll also talk about the problems of a profession where over 70% of the faculty are now contingent or adjunct (non-permanent, no benefits, no security, sometimes below livable wage).  How do MOOCs fit into the picture?  Do they help?  Do they hurt?  Why do legislators want to believe MOOCs will solve a problem caused by a thirty-year and escalating defunding of public education?   And what is the difference between peer-to-peer open and participatory learning and MOOCs?

_________________________________________________________________________



Wednesday, February 19, 2014



Week 4 of the History and Future of (Mostly) Higher Education Coursera MOOC begins on Monday, February 17, 2014.



Due date: Post the first draft of your basic, preliminary ideas for designing higher education from scratch on the Coursera forums.  For inspiration, read this article about Chicago artist/community builder/architect/activist/visionary/preservationist/business man Theaster Gates.  What if this (not Harvard or Duke) were the model to build upon and aspire to?

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/22/magazine/chicagos-opportunity-artist.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0



Reading:

Davidson, Cathy N.  “The Epic Win.” Now You See It: How the Brain Science of Attention Will Transform the Way We Live, Work, and Learn. New York: Penguin Books. 2011. Print.

Damasceno, Cristiane Sommer. “Paying Attention to the Chocolate-Covered Broccoli:  How Video Games Can Change the Ways You Understand Teaching, Learning, and Knowledge.” Field Notes for 21st Century Literacies: A Guide to New Theories, Methods, and Practices for Open Peer Teaching and Learning. Print, HASTAC, RapGenius. 2013.  

Davis, Jade. “The Medium of the 21st Century is Light; Or, How Earbuds Became Earlids.” Field Notes for 21st Century Literacies: A Guide to New Theories, Methods, and Practices for Open Peer Teaching and Learning. Print, HASTAC, RapGenius. 2013.  

Stratton, Jennifer. “Everyday by Design:  What do 21st Century Digital Literacies Look Like?” Field Notes for 21st Century Literacies: A Guide to New Theories, Methods, and Practices for Open Peer Teaching and Learning. Print, HASTAC, RapGenius. 2013.   

Berrett, Dan. “Harvard Mounts Campaign to Bolster Undergraduate Humanities.” The Chronicle of Higher Education. 2013. Online.

Butler, Judith. DLitt - McGill 2013 Honorary Doctorate Address. 2013. Online.

Wesch, Michael. A Vision of Students Today. 2007. Online.  

Davidson, Cathy N.  “A Core Curriculum to Create Engaged Entrepreneurs.” Fast Company. 2012. Online.

Wadewitz, Adrianne. What I Learned Being the Worst Student in the Class. 2013. Online.



Supplementary Reading on Digital Literacies:

Florida Center for Instructional Technology. “Research Tools.” The Internet: Ideas, Activities, and Resources. 2013. Online.  

The McGraw-Hill Companies. How to Judge the Reliability of Internet Information. 2001. Online.  

Sengupta, Somini. “Digital Tools to Curb Snooping.” The New York Times. 2013. Online.

Belshaw, Doug. “Transitioning into a new role at Mozilla.” Open Educational Thinkering. 2013. Online.

Weller, Martin. The Digital Scholar: How Technology is Transforming Scholarly Practice. New York: Bloomsbury Academic. 2011. Online.



Supplementary Reading on Liberal Arts and Engaged Global Citizenship:

"College, Reinvented." The Chronicle of Higher Education. 2012. Online.

Inspiring Education - Alberta’s Vision for Education. Online.  

“Is massive open online research the next frontier for education?” PhysOrg. 2013. Online.

“Could World Culture Forum Become a Davos for Arts and Culture?” Guardian. 2013.  Online.



Essential:  Natalie Cecire, “Humanities Scholarship is Incredibly Relevant--and that Makes People Sad.  Online.  




Assignments:

(1) Participate in Coursera “Week 4: 10 Ways to Change the Paradigm of Higher Education”   Group 4 MOOC Wrangles and CHE Blogs; First Draft Higher Ed from Scratch

  • Watch the videos

  • Watch the student-made videos on youtube about higher education; Community wranglers will help troubleshoot the video-posting process for Coursera students.

  • You are welcome to participate in the peer-review process.

  • Review and respond to comments for designing higher education from scratch.

  • Discuss your experience, ideas, and video in class.

 

Coursera week description:

Course now switches to look at innovation in higher education:  new principles, new methods, new metrics for redesigning an innovative form of learning that helps us all in the complexities of the world we actually inhabit outside of school, all the time (including by those excluded from participation in that world by reasons of cost, country, censorship, access, ability, or other reasons).   We’ll begin with three innovations on the level of curriculum



Curricular Change:

1) Practice Digital Literacies

2) Find Creative Ways to Model Unlearning

3) Rethink Liberal Arts as a Start-Up Curriculum for a Resilient Global Citizens



(2) Post the first draft of your basic, preliminary ideas on Coursera: Designing Higher Education from Scratch This will be posted as a Forum on Coursera and you will be responsible for responding to suggestions made in this Forum.  



The mottos borrowed for ISIS 640 are:   “Changing the Way We Teach and Learn” (HASTAC’s motto);  “Difference is our Operating System” (another HASTAC motto); “Digital literacy with a maker spirit” and “Learning to make better lives.”   What is the motto that encapsulates and inspires the mission of your institution of higher learning?



How do you design learning from scratch?   Check out what’s happening at the Stanford D School, “Solving Problems for Real World, Using Design,” New York Times,  December 30, 2013. http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/30/technology/solving-problems-for-real-world-using-design.html?hpw&rref=education&_r=0



Check out Quest University in British Columbia, Canada:  http://player.fm/series/american-radioworks-355/american-radioworks-this-college-breaks-the-mold



Please review the template questions to get you started.



(A) If you could design higher education, what would it look like?   Divide into project teams, work out the scope of your university for your team, name your university (i.e. Dewey U, Rad Community College, Humanities Vocational Tech, Engagement Professional School of Finance, Law, Technology, and Ethics etc). Each  team will be responsible for starting a Forum on Coursera for that particular institution of higher learning.  



Here are some considerations:  Who are your students, how do you select them and recruit them?  What are your expectations for them?  What constitutes “graduation” from your university?  Are there required courses?  Methods?  Attendance? Participation?  Outline your audience, your expectations, your requirements, your objectives, your technological affordances, your tuition and fees (if any---or your alternative mode of “payment” if you don’t want to charge), your languages, and anything else you think is important to higher education. What is the “better life” (see Amartya Sen’s quote above) for which your institution prepares its students?  How will you help them toward that better life?   Think about the ideal (realistic) administrative structure and your business model for sustaining your institution.  



(B) Please put up the prospectus for your institution in two places:  (1) put it up on our class blog or in a Google Doc that isn’t editable so you have a stable place from which to see how much others change the prospectus and (2) put it up in the Coursera Forum and invite the community to add to or edit the document (you can define how you want to do this and add that to your instructions.



(C) Moderate and contribute to the online international discussion that ensues.   



(D) Report back on the feedback and response and additions to your institutions.  Compare and contrast the original and the crowdsourced version.  


________________________________________________________________

Wednesday, February 26, 2014



Google Hangout featuring Professor David Palumbo-Liu, Stanford.  Reading and discussion: The Deliverance of Others:  Reading Literature in a Global Age, focus Preface, Intro, Chapter 3 (on Never Let Me Go); and Sommer, “Pre-Texts Project.”



Week 5 of the History and Future of (Mostly) Higher Education Coursera MOOC begins on Monday, February 24, 2014.




Reading:

Palumbo-Liu, David. “Preface,” “Introduction,” and “Chapter 3. Art: A Foreign Exchange.” The Deliverance of Others: Reading Literature in a Global Age. Duke University Press. 2012. Print.

Davidson, Christina C. “Open for Whom?: Designing for Inclusion, Navigating the Digital Divide.” Field Notes for 21st Century Literacies: A Guide to New Theories, Methods, and Practices for Open Peer Teaching and Learning. Print, HASTAC, RapGenius. 2013.  

Davidson, Cathy N. “How We Measure.” Now You See It: How the Brain Science of Attention Will Transform the Way We Live, Work, and Learn. New York: Penguin Books. 2011. Print.

Grant, Sheryl.  Measuring What Matters:  Designing a New Credential and Assessment System from Scratch. Online.



Supplementary Reading on Encouraging Students to Lead:

Schwartz, Katrina. “5 Tools to Help Students Learn How to Learn.” KQED Mind/Shift. 2013. Online.

Phillips, Amanda. Gaming the System: Things I Learned by Asking Lit Majors to Design Their Own Digital Games. 2013. Online.



Supplementary Reading on Diversity:

Coates, Ta-Nehisi. “If I Were a Black Kid...Advice for students in Baltimore Coutny and Cambridge, Massachusetts.” The Atlantic. 2013. Online.

Kroll, Andy. “Silicon Valley’s Awful Race and Gender Problem in 3 Mind-Blowing Charts.” Mother Jones. 2013. Online.

Bishop, Bill. “Are You Willing to Send Your Child to the Same School as the Children of Vegetable and Rice Sellers?” The Sinocism China Newsletter. 2011. Online.

Moten, Fred and Stefano Harney. “The University and the Undercommons: Seven Theses.” Project Muse. 2004. Online.

Gumbs, Alexis Pauline. ”Digital Alchemist Intensives”. Eternal Summer of the Black Feminist Mind. 2013. Online.



Assignment:

(1) Participate in Coursera “Week 5: Innovations in Pedagogy and Assessment”  GROUP 5 MOOC WRANGLES AND CHE BLOGS

  • Watch the videos

  • Watch the student-made videos on youtube about higher education; Community wranglers will help troubleshoot the video-posting process for Coursera students.

  • Review and respond to comments for designing higher education from scratch.

  • You are welcome to participate in the peer-review process.

  • Discuss your experience, ideas, and video in class.

 

Coursera week description:

This focus is on pedagogy and assessment - because how you teach is what you teach, and what you count is what you value.  



4) Make! From Critical Thinking to Creative Contribution - Focuses on John Dewey and the idea of thinking, then doing, then thinking again.   What making adds to our activist toolkit, including a sense that an idea is not an end product but a process, and that iteration--publish first, edit later--helps you to be bold, to try new things, to experiment, change, and innovate.



5) Encourage Students to Lead. Our “texts” in this class are student-created:  DukeSurprise.com and Field Notes for 21st Century Literacies  



6) Make Diversity Your Operating System.  HASTAC's Motto:  "Difference is not our deficit; it's our operating system."  Introduces John Hope Franklin (1915-2009):  “My challenge was to weave into the study of American history enough of a presence of blacks so the story of the United States could be told accurately.”   How can learning and education be “accurate”?  



7) Assessment: Make Sure What We Value is What We Count.  


8) Demonstrate Mastery of Content by Performance, not Testing.  Introduces the work of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Digital Media and Learning Initiative on behalf of “connected learning” and badges http://www.hastac.org/digital-badges



(2) Continue working in project teams on the designing higher education from scratch including in possibly posting a revision of your original Feb 19 entry or continuing to respond to new Forum responses.   



_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Wednesday, March 5, 2014



Google Hangout:  Part II featuring Professor David Palumbo-Liu, Stanford; and Doris Sommer, Harvard; Howard Rheingold, Stanford.  Reading and discussion: Sommer, “Pre-Texts Project”; Howard Rheingold, Net Smart



Week 6 of the History and Future of (Mostly) Higher Education Coursera MOOC begins on Monday, March 3, 2014.



Reading:

Morgan, Patrick Thomas. “Practicing Web Wisdom: Mindfully Incorporating Digital Literacies into the Classroom.” Field Notes to 21st Century Literacies:  A Guide to New Theories, Methods, and Practices for Open Peer Teaching and Learning. Print, HASTAC, RapGenius. 2013.

Rheingold, Howard. Net Smart. MIT Press. 2012. Available online or in print.

Davidson, Cathy N. and David Theo Goldberg. “Chapter 5. Institutions as Mobilizing Networks: (Or, ‘I Hate the Institution--But I Love What It Did for Me.’” The Future of Thinking:  Learning Institutions in a Digital Age. MIT Press. 2009. Available online or in print.



Supplementary Reading for Funding Public Education:

  • Perez-Pena, Richard. “College Enrollment Falls as Economy Recovers.” The New York Times. 2013. Online.  

  • Duderstadt, James J. “The Crisis in Financing Public Higher Education-and a Possible Solution: A 21st C Learn Grant Act.” The Millenium Project. 2005. Online.     

  • Rose, Katherine. “Education in the 21st Century.” Top Masters in Education. 2013. Online.

  • Wadhwa, Vivek. “Dear Peter Thiel: Let’s Fix College, the Right Way”. Mashable. Online.

  • Wadhwa, Vivek. “Billionaire’s Failed Education Experiment Proves There’s No Shortcut To Success.” Forbes. Online.

  • Ehrenberg, Ronald G. “Is the Golden Age of the Private Research University Over?” Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning. Online.

  • Ehrenberg, Ronald G. “American Higher Education in Transition” Journal of Economic Perspectives. Online.

  • Ehrenberg, Ronald G. “THE PERFECT STORM and the Privatization of Public Higher Education”. Change. Online.

  • Cottom, Tressie McMillan. “A Bechdel Test for Higher-Ed ‘Disruption’”. Slate. 2013. Online.

  • “U.S. In State Tuition Ranking: The Cheapest Colleges in America by In State Tuition for 2013.” CollegeCalc. Online.  

  • Davidson, Cathy N. “Why Does College Cost So Much -- And Why Do So Many Pundits Get It Wrong?” HASTAC. 2013. Online.

  • Perlstein, Rick. “On the Death of Democratic Higher Education.” The Nation. 2013. Online.



Supplementary Reading for building a You-niversity:

  • Christensen, Clayton M. and Michael B. Horn. “Innovation Imperative: Change Everything -- Online Education as an Agent of Transformation” The New York Times. 2013. Online.

  • Kamanetz, Anya. “Fast Company’s Guide to the Generation Flux College Degree.” Fast Company. Online.



Assignments:

(1) Participate in Coursera “Week 6: How to Make Institutional Change”  Group 6 MOOC Wrangles and CHE Blogs

  • Watch the videos

  • Watch the student-made videos on youtube about higher education; Community wranglers will help troubleshoot the video-posting process for Coursera students.

  • Review and respond to comments for designing higher education from scratch.

  • You are welcome to participate in the peer-review process.

  • Discuss your experience, ideas, and video in class.

 

Coursera week description:

This week we will discuss the different ways of making not just personal learning innovations but actual institutional change.



9) Make Alliances with Other Change Makers--offers lessons and examples of changes that can and are happening.  



10) Reinvest in Public Education:  discusses the devastating effects of the thirty-year downward trend in U.S. public funding for education and offers international perspective on what is happening elsewhere.



BONUS:  Just Do It! An interview with  with Dennis Quaintance, CEO of Proximity Hotel, Greensboro, North Carolina, who crowdsourced, along with eighty other workers, the nation's first Platinum LEED (sustainable) hotel.  They learned from others.  They experimented.  They committed themselves to do it.  They succeeded.  Moral of this story:  If eighty people in North Carolina could do this, why isn't everyone else?   It wasn't that hard.   So again, the question:  If we could do it, why isn't everyone else?



(2) Continue working in project teams on the Creating a University from Scratch including in possibly posting a revision of your original Feb 19 entry or continuing to respond to new Forum responses.   



_________________________________________________________________________________________________

Spring Break: Wednesday, March 12, 2014



The History and Future of (Mostly) Higher Education Coursera MOOC ends Monday, March 10.



Christopher Newfield’s UCSB class ends Tuesday, March 11



Professor Howard Rheingold’s class ends Tuesday, March 13



David Palumbo-Liu’s Stanford class ends Wednesday, March 14



__________________________________________________________________________



Wednesday, March 19, 2014



Learning Design Workshop I   (The Un-Class)

Drawing from what we accomplished the first half of this course, continue to define your project of modeling a university from scratch.   You cannot do everything.  What will you focus on?  What is your project for the last half of the course?  How will you take what you have learned and communicate it so that it has maximum impact in the world?  What will you do to make it as effective a lesson as possible beyond the sphere of this course?  The goal of the course is not an “A” but actual impact in the world.



What is the public interface for your project?



What’s your activist plan for ensuring it has the most real-world impact?



“Un-Class” (i.e. like an Un-conference).  Pitch ideas.  Create Teams.  Project Assignments, Job Descriptions, Roles.   



What innovation do you propose for higher education?  Who, what, where, why, how?  What tools?  What methods?  What partners?

“Un-Class” (i.e. like an Un-conference).  Pitch ideas.  Create Teams.  Project Assignments, Job Descriptions, Roles.   

_____________________________________________________________



Wednesday, March 26, 2014



Learning Design Workshop II   (Project Pitch and Crit Session)

15 minute presentation of team project:   napkin sketch, maquette or power point presentation--argument, project objective, audience, communication plan.   Class “crit” session.  



Peer assessment of contribution #1: is everyone satisfied with level of contribution by each member of the group?  (“Badging” exercise, pp. 234-236, Field Notes to 21st Century Literacies)



_________________________________________________________________________



Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Learning Design Workshop III  (Revised Project Pitch and Plan to Launch Into the World)

Revised 15 minute presentation of team project:   napkin sketch, maquette or power point presentation--argument, project objective, audience, communication plan.  Class “crit” session.  



Assignment:   Put your project out into the world.   What assignment do you have for the class?  How will you call upon others in your networks (our class, our co-located classes, HASTAC initiative partners, Coursera participants) to further your objectives?  Mobilize your network!



Peer assessment of contribution #2: is everyone satisfied with level of contribution by each member of the group?  (“Badging” exercise, pp. 234-236, Field Notes to 21st Century Literacies)

_________________________________________________________________________



Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Learning Design Workshop IV   (Results?  What next?)

15 minute presentation:   Report on what happened with your project.  Reach, spread, analytics, impact, self-analysis.  



Peer assessment of contribution #3: is everyone satisfied with level of contribution by each member of the group?  (“Badging” exercise, pp. 234-236, Field Notes to 21st Century Literacies)

__________________________________________________________________________



Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Last day of class


Party Like It’s 2099

 

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3 comments

Highly recommend Jeff Seligno's College UnBound, and Hacker & Dreifus, Higher Education? as a little broader in their critique, a little less academic in their solutions, and a lot more political and practical in their applications. I also recommend Julian Alssid's College for America, as at least one viable option, and as a pilot/demonstration of how one place has undermined "seat time" and Taylorism.

More, certainly, will come later. For irony and context, Andrew Hacker's father, Louis Hacker (with a wonderfully mis-spelled obituary!) was my mentor at Columbia (before the 1968 revolution), and founded the School of General Studies, in the 1930's, another "transformative decade." And, just to ice a cake, you might also look at Mark Rudd's Underground, to see where the transformations of the era of our youth started..and...ended. He underscores how higher ed could have been more courageous and helped produce what now we have, and what our grandkids have to face. As context, Hacker's father was a socialist, then a Republican, and, finally, a populist democrat (with that small "d" underscored). Cycles are always fascinating in history.

70

I read through the syllabus and 1) I wish I could join the face-to-face course and 2) I would love to design a course like this in the future. Sounds like its going to be a great course. Since I am based in LA, I enrolled in the Coursera version (which I heve never taken a course in this manner), so very much looking forward to it!

56

It's going to be amazing and there will be so many participatory events that you can engage in and other students you can meet.   Plus Christopher Newfield is teaching his class at UCSB . . . not so far away from you!  WELCOME!

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