Blog Post

Score Another One for Open/Blended Peer Learning!

So exciting! Every grad student in "21st Century Literacies" turned in a chapter on time. How often does that happen?   Plus it is brilliant work on a whole range of ideas, concepts, even on how you do multimedia design.   Thrilling.   This was a peer-taught graduate class, with students choosing the works to be discussed and making the presentations and the assignments.   Then we each (yes, I was a student too!) wrote a chapter, gave feedback, and on May 20 we will have a final HackaBook session where we turn these chapters into a book.   The current title is: "Field Notes for 21st Century Literacies: A Guide to New Theories, Methods, and Practices for Open Peer Teaching and Learning."

 

The book will be available on hastac.org and also published on Lulu for those who prefer paper. Proud, proud, proud, proud, proud, proud. (Did I saw I was proud???)

 

And it will be one of the free, open text books in the Coursera course I'm teaching Spring 2014, "The History and Future of Higher Education."   The English Department DGS at Duke turned down my bid to teach this as a face-to-face graduate course along side the Coursera course, using the affordances of that tool to engage in worldwide conversations about the role of higher education in society and the role of the humanities in higher education.  But we will still run a face to face unit on this in the PhD Lab in Digital Knowledge and I'll teach an undergraduate face to face class and I believe there might be another department where I can do it as a graduate class too.  

 

In any case, I know about twenty people around the world who will also be teaching a f2f class on some version of "The History and Future of Higher Education" so that we can all be learning together in hybrid global fashion.   Each segment will have Forum opportunities for massive online conversations, especially but not exclusively about the role of an expanded humanities in the future of higher education and in society at large.  We will also use the Forums to talk about the role of online education, who it includes, who it excludes, who it privileges and who it undermines, and whether such online communities and peer learning adds to our hurts the array of other institutions around and whether it opens greater employment possibilities for future teachers or, as some fear, means the end of the professorate.  

 

I do not know the answer.   That is why I'm so excited by the range of experiments that will help us to learn more.  I hope you will join us.   And I hope you like it that one of the free, online textbooks will be student-produced, about open learning---the future is now.  Of course that is a cliche but it sometimes feels right and captures a kind of excitement, a threshold, a liminal moment.   Yes, indeed.  The future is now. 

 

Field Notes for 21st Century Literacies

A Guide to New Theories, Methods, and Practices for Open Peer Teaching and Learning

 

MAY 3, 2013

 

Edited by The 21st Century Collective

 

by

 

Cristiane Damasceno, Omar Daouk, Cathy N. Davidson, Christina C. Davidson, Jade E. Davis, Patrick Thomas Morgan, Elizabeth A. Pitts, Barry Peddycord III, Jennifer Stratton.

 

The major advances in civilization are processes that all but wreck the societies in which they occur.”

--Alfred North Whitehead (quoted in Marshall McLuhan and Quentin Fiore,The Medium is the Massage, 1967).

 

“The discovery of the alphabet will create forgetfulness in the learners’ souls, because they will not use their memories; they will trust to the external written characters and not remember of themselves . . . You give your disciplines not truth but only the semblance of truth; they will be heroes of many things, and will have learned nothing; they will appear to be omniscient and will generally know nothing.” --Socrates, “Phaedrus”

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Preface  (TBD May 20)

 

Chapter One:   Why Every Class Needs to Write a Constitution  Cathy N. Davidson 

 

Chapter Two:   FROM OPEN PROGRAMMING TO OPEN LEARNING:

THE CATHEDRAL, THE BAZAAR, AND THE OPEN CLASSROOM  Elizabeth A. Pitts and Barry Peddycord III

 

Chapter Three:  PRACTICING WEB WISDOM:  MINDFULLY INCORPORATING DIGITAL LITERACIES INTO THE CLASSROOM  Patrick Morgan

 

Chapter Four: PAYING ATTENTION TO THE CHOCOLATE COVERED BROCCOLI:  HOW VIDEO GAMES CAN CHANGE THE WAYS YOU UNDERSTAND TEACHING, LEARNING, AND KNOWLEDGE   BY Cristiane Sommer Damasceno

 

CHAPTER Five  THE MEDIUM OF THE 21ST CENTURY IS LIGHT:

Or, How Earbuds Became Earlids: FIELD NOTES ON THE DIGITAL MEDIUM FOR TEACHERS AND LEARNERS IN AN AGE OF DATA, BANDWIDTH, CABLES, PHOTOOPTICS, SCANNERS, LASERS, PRINTERS, FIBEROPTICS, AND ALL OTHER THINGS DIGITAL AND OTHERWISE In a Post-McLuhan Electronic Age etc., or Why We Wrote a Book   Jade E. Davis (@jadedid)

 

Chapter Six:  OPEN FOR WHOM? DESIGNING FOR INCLUSION, NAVIGATING THE DIGITAL DIVIDE  Christina C. Davidson

 

Chapter Seven: #EveryDayByDesign Or, WHAT DO 21ST CENTURY DIGITAL LITERACIES LOOK LIKE?By: Jennifer Stratton

 

CHAPTER EIGHT  Surprise Endings:Putting the Lessons into Action  Omar Daouk

 

CONCLUSION  (TBD May 20)

Appendices

  • Bibliography
  • Useful Tools
  • Keywords Defined
  • Contributors  (bios)

 

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Field Notes for 21st Century Literacies

A Guide to New Theories, Methods, and Practices for Open Peer Teaching and Learning

 

MAY 3, 2013

 

Edited by The 21st Century Collective

 

by

 

Cristiane Damasceno, Omar Daouk, Cathy N. Davidson, Christina C. Davidson, Jade E. Davis, Patrick Thomas Morgan, Elizabeth A. Pitts, Barry Peddycord III, Jennifer Stratton.

 

The major advances in civilization are processes that all but wreck the societies in which they occur.”

--Alfred North Whitehead (quoted in Marshall McLuhan and Quentin Fiore,The Medium is the Massage, 1967).

 

“The discovery of the alphabet will create forgetfulness in the learners’ souls, because they will not use their memories; they will trust to the external written characters and not remember of themselves . . . You give your disciplines not truth but only the semblance of truth; they will be heroes of many things, and will have learned nothing; they will appear to be omniscient and will generally know nothing.” --Socrates, “Phaedrus”

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Preface  (TBD May 20)

 

Chapter One:   Why Every Class Needs to Write a Constitution  Cathy N. Davidson 

 

Chapter Two:   FROM OPEN PROGRAMMING TO OPEN LEARNING:

THE CATHEDRAL, THE BAZAAR, AND THE OPEN CLASSROOM  Elizabeth A. Pitts and Barry Peddycord III

 

Chapter Three:  PRACTICING WEB WISDOM:  MINDFULLY INCORPORATING DIGITAL LITERACIES INTO THE CLASSROOM  Patrick Morgan

 

Chapter Four: PAYING ATTENTION TO THE CHOCOLATE COVERED BROCCOLI:  HOW VIDEO GAMES CAN CHANGE THE WAYS YOU UNDERSTAND TEACHING, LEARNING, AND KNOWLEDGE   BY Cristiane Sommer Damasceno

 

CHAPTER Five  THE MEDIUM OF THE 21ST CENTURY IS LIGHT:

Or, How Earbuds Became Earlids: FIELD NOTES ON THE DIGITAL MEDIUM FOR TEACHERS AND LEARNERS IN AN AGE OF DATA, BANDWIDTH, CABLES, PHOTOOPTICS, SCANNERS, LASERS, PRINTERS, FIBEROPTICS, AND ALL OTHER THINGS DIGITAL AND OTHERWISE In a Post-McLuhan Electronic Age etc., or Why We Wrote a Book   Jade E. Davis (@jadedid)

 

Chapter Six:  OPEN FOR WHOM? DESIGNING FOR INCLUSION, NAVIGATING THE DIGITAL DIVIDE  Christina C. Davidson

 

Chapter Seven: #EveryDayByDesign Or, WHAT DO 21ST CENTURY DIGITAL LITERACIES LOOK LIKE?By: Jennifer Stratton

 

CHAPTER EIGHT  Surprise Endings:Putting the Lessons into Action  Omar Daouk

 

CONCLUSION  (TBD May 20)

Appendices

  • Bibliography
  • Useful Tools
  • Keywords Defined
  • Contributors  (bios)

 

96