Blog Post

4Humanities Mission Statement

Alan Liu of University of California Santa Barbara has asked David Theo Goldberg and myself to be members of a new advocacy organization, 4Humanities.   He has also invited HASTAC's network to be involved.   We are!   We urge you to pass along this mission statement to your colleagues, students, deans, presidents, trustees, community members, and anywhere that it can do some good!

 

4Humanities Mission Statement (http://humanistica.ualberta.ca/mission/)]:

 

4Humanities is a site created by the international community of digital humanities scholars and educators to assist in advocacy for the humanities.  Government and private support for the humanities for research, teaching, preservation, and creative renewal in such fields as literature, history, languages, philosophy, classics, art history, cultural studies, libraries, and so on are in decline.  In some nations, especially since the economic recession that started in 2007, the decline has resulted in major cuts in government and university funding.  Leaders of society and business stake all the future on innovative and entrepreneurial discoveries in science, engineering, biomedicine, green technology, and so on.  But the humanities contribute the needed perspective, training in complex human phenomena, and communication skills needed to spark, understand, and make human the new discoveries.  In the process, they themselves discover new, and also very old, ways to be human.  They do so through their unique contribution of the wisdom of the past, awareness of other cultures in the present, and imagination of innovative and fair futures.  Many people care about the humanities, not just in the educational and cultural institutions directly affected by the recent cutbacks, but also in business, government, science, media, politics, the professions, and the general public.  They believe that society will be poorer, not richer, without the humanities to help us grasp, and evolve, what it means to be human and humane in todays complex world.

4Humanities is both a platform and a resource for humanities advocacy.   As a platform, 4Humanities stages the efforts of humanities advocates to reach out to the public.  We are a combination newspaper, magazine, channel, blog, wiki, and social network.  We solicit well-reasoned or creative demonstrations, examples, testimonials, arguments, opinion pieces, open letters, press releases, print posters, video advertisements, write-in campaigns, social-media campaigns, short films, and other innovative forms of humanities advocacy, along with accessibly-written scholarly works grounding the whole in research or reflection about the state of the humanities.

As a resource, 4Humanities provides humanities advocates with a stockpile of digital tools, collaboration methods, royalty-free designs and images, best practices, new-media expertise, and customizable newsfeeds of issues and events relevant to the state of the humanities in any local or national context.  Whether humanities advocates choose to conduct their publicity on 4Humanities itself or instead through their own newsletter, Web site, blog, and so on, we want to help with the best that digital-humanities experts have to offer.

4Humanities began because the digital humanities communitywhich specializes in making creative use of digital technology to advance humanities research and teaching as well as to think about the basic nature of the new media and technologieswoke up to its special potential and responsibility to assist humanities advocacy.  The digital humanities are increasingly integrated in the humanities at large.  They catch the eye of administrators and funding agencies who otherwise dismiss the humanities as yesterdays news.  They connect across disciplines with science and engineering fields.  They have the potential to use new technologies to help the humanities communicate with, and adapt to, contemporary society.

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1 comment

the beauty is that the more you disenfranchise historical disciplines the less clearly you remember why that's a bad idea

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