Blog Post

Future of Learning is Future of the Web

We are very excited that we were asked to put on a panel at FutureWeb, the colocated conference with the WWW2010 annual meeting that will be held in Raleigh, NC, next week.  I'm chairing "The Future of Learning is the Future of the Web" on April 30, 3:30-500.  The participants include Negar Mottahedeh, Laurent Dubois, Mark Anthony Neal, and Tony O'Driscoll.  Come join us!

 

Panel: The Future of Learning Is The Future of the Web
90-minute panel, April 30, 2010 3:30-5:00pm
Chair: Cathy N. Davidson, Ruth F. DeVarney Professor of English and John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies,
Co-founder of HASTAC
cathy.davidson@duke.edu, 919-684-8471
 
Panel Description:
What do sports, Iranian election protests, Black popular culture, world soccer championships, global executive education, and a Twitter film festival have in common? All are ways that innovative faculty are transforming education now, using the affordances of the Web to rethink the basic configurations of what higher education might look like and do. What does a classroom look like when students can be in many cities at once? What does a teacher look like when participation and contribution happen from anywhere in the globe? What does a student look like when those "enrolled" in a class at one university are in interaction with other students beyond the classroom walls? What does learning look like when it is participatory? And what are the downsides? What does "open" mean when the majority of scholarly resources are locked in journals, in private archives, beyond the reach of many? And what does higher education have to contribute to the future of the Web? These are questions that will be raised by this panel of stellar interdisciplinary scholars from across many fields and with several different national and international areas of expertise, some of whom are also working on reforming "open access" policy for U.S. universities.  On many levels, the future of learning is the future of the web.
 
Bios
Panel Chair:
 
Cathy N. Davidson has published some twenty books and is the co-founder (with David Theo Goldberg) of HASTAC (pronounced haystack, Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Advanced Collaboratory). A network of networks, HASTAC now has some 3800 members dedicated to rethinking the design of new learning technologies, participatory learning, and the role of technology in social live and learning.  HASTAC administers the annual $2 million MacArthur Foundation Digital Media and Learning Competition.  In its third year, the 2010 Competition, Reimagining Learning, is a collaboration with the White House Educate to Innovate Initiative as well as with Sony, EA, and ESA.   Along with Goldberg, she is the author of The Future of Thinking:  Learning Institutions in a Digital Age.  Her Now You See It:  The Science of Attention in the Classroom, at Work, and Everywhere Else will be published by Viking Press in Fall 2010. Dr. Davidson also chairs Duke University's Digital Futures Task Force which has been charged with forming a university-wide open access policy. http://www.hastac.org
 
Panelists:
Laurent Dubois
Author of Soccer Empire: The World Cup and the Future of France, Slave Revolution in the Caribbean, 1789-1804: A Brief History With Documents (with John Garrigus), Avengers of the New World: The Story of the Haitian Revolution, and A Colony of Citizens: Revolution and Slave Emancipation in the French Caribbean, 1787-1804, Professor Dubois is a historian of French colonialism and the Caribbean and also writes on the global politics of football. His discussion forum about the power of global soccer is http://blogs-dev.oit.duke.edu/wcwp/ (See attached poster.) http://news.duke.edu/2009/12/dubois.html, http://ondemand.duke.edu/video/20801/laurent-dubois-talks-haitian-h
 
Negar Mottahedeh
Author of Representing the Unpresentable: Images of Reform from the Qajars to the Islamic Republic of Iran and Displaced Allegories: Post-Revolutionary Iranian Cinema, Professor Mottahedeh also received national notice for staging the first-ever Twitter Film Festival as well as for serving as a communications node in the Iranian election protests. Her blog is the Negarponti Files (http://negarpontifiles.blogspot.com/). https://fds.duke.edu/db/aas/Literature/negar, http://ondemand.duke.edu/video/20953/negar-mottahedeh-on-social-med
 
Mark Anthony Neal
Author of New Black Man, That's the Joint!: The Hip-Hop Studies Reader, Songs in the Key of Black Life: A Rhythm and Blues Nation, Soul Babies: Black Popular Culture and the Post-Soul Aesthetic, What the Music Said: Black Popular Music and Black Public Culture, Freedom Summer Remembered: A Conversation with Denise Nicholas, Birth of New Blackness: The Family Stand's Moon in Scorpio and It's Your Nigger Problem, Not Hip-Hop's, Professor Neal is one of the foremost scholars of Black popular culture in America. He writes the New Black Man website (http://newblackman.blogspot.com/) and is a national commentator on all forms of media.
http://aaas.duke.edu/people?Gurl=%2Faas%2FAAAS&Uil=man9&subpage=profile
 
Tony O'Driscoll
Tony O'Driscoll is a Professor of the Practice at Duke Universitys Fuqua School of Business where he teaches, researches and consults in the areas of strategy, innovation and technology management, organization learning, services management, and management consulting. Dr. O Driscoll also serves as Executive Director of Fuquas Center for IT and Media; a research center dedicated to understanding the strategic, structural, operational and business model issues associated with these vibrant and volatile sectors. http://www.fuqua.duke.edu/faculty_research/faculty_directory/odriscoll/
 
 

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Duke University professor Negar Mottahedeh to speak on social media use in Iranian elections, film

22 04 2010  by Rachel Cieri

 

Photo courtesy of Duke Images

 Duke University professor and social media expert Negar Mottahedeh started using Facebook to appease her mother. Little did she know, she’d be using the website to find safe havens for victims of violence in the Iranian election protest last summer.

Originally from Iran, most of Mottahedeh’s family managed to leave the country before the revolution in 1979, and since then, they’ve spread all over the world, from Norway to Kenya to Chile.

“I originally saw it as a way to unite the family and organized get togethers,” she said.

But she quickly recognized that social media could be used in even more powerful ways. In her work as an educator, she had her film students blog responses to movies, post comments on their readings and tweet their work to the “outside world.”

“Most Duke students come from a place of privilege,” Mottahedeh said. “Many already know a great deal, and they are there to get evidence for the fact that they know a great deal.”

With that in mind, her Introduction to Film Studies class organized the first-ever Twitter Film Festival to share their knowledge with the public. The class made segments and analysis from 35 of their favorite films public on the class blog, tweeting links to each and attracting more than 300 followers from all walks of life.

“Within the field of academics, I think [social media] will change the way we do research and the way we think about writing,” Mottahedeh said. “I think it will connect us as academics and help us stick alongside people who are not in academics.”

It wasn’t until last summer, though, that she and thousands of others watched as Twitter, Facebook and Google Maps were used to spread a global message in the Iranian presidential elections. As the incumbent regime suppressed protests on the ground, hundreds of thousands were tweeting their support or opposition.

Though Mottahedeh said she did not want to take sides in the political activism because it did not directly affect her, she became concerned by reports that the military police were taking the wounded to prison instead of hospitals.

“I joined the humanitarian effort to identify on Google Maps safe havens, directions and address for the injured to receive treatment,” she said.

In an effort to conceal their whereabouts, thousands of people tweeting from the ground changed their time zones, so only early followers like Mottahedeh knew where the information was coming from. She served as an active observer, posting her take on the use of social media in the crisis on her blog, The Negarponti Files.

Mottahedeh watched with the rest of the world as Iranian activists showed their support in unprecedented ways. In the past, protestors had worked to conceal their identities, but a new movement emerged in which tweeters showed their support by adding a green overlay to their avatars, with their faces turned straight to the camera.

Perhaps the most surprising movement came after a student was arrested for speaking about reform and human rights. The government-owned newspaper published photos of him wearing a woman’s veil, saying that he’d donned women’s clothing to escape persecution. Rumors to the contrary said the government forced him to wear the veil in an attempt to demean him.

In response, thousands of Iranian men changed their avatars to straight-on photos in women’s clothing. And it didn’t just stay online. All over the world, cross-dressed men gathered in person in demonstration of their support.

It was a statement saying, ‘I stand here in opposition to government. I stand against violations in human rights,’” Mottahedeh said. “I doubt that this kind of protest would be possible without social media.”

Mottahedeh will speak more about her observations and insights during the Future of Social Networks panel at FutureWeb April 29.

By Rachel Cieri

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The Future of Learning is the Web

26 04 2010

FutureWeb 2010 Conference, Raleigh, N.C., April 30, 3:30-5 p.m.

Chair: Cathy Davidson, professor of Interdisciplinary Studies at Duke University. Davidson is the co-founder of HASTAC – the Humanities, Arts, Science and Technology Advanced Collaboratory. Her research interests include American Literature, technology, the American novel, printing, race and gender and digital media and learning. Click here to view a full list of her published works.

Panel description: What do sports, Iranian election protests, Black popular culture, world soccer championships, global executive education and a Twitter film festival have in common? All are ways that innovative faculty are transforming education now, rethinking the basic configurations of higher education. What does a classroom look like when students can be in many cities at once? What does a teacher look like when participation and contribution happen from anywhere in the globe? What does learning look like when it is participatory? And what are the downsides? What does “open” mean when the majority of scholarly resources are locked in journals, in private archives, beyond the reach of many? And what does higher education have to contribute to the future of the Web? On many levels, the future of learning is the future of the Web. The panel will aim to specifically isolate the key challenges and opportunities in the looming future for learning and the Web and it will work to identify some specific action steps that can be taken today to work for a better tomorrow.

Panelists:

 


  • Laurent Dubois

    Laurent Dubois, a historian of French colonialism and the Caribbean who also writes on the global politics of football. His discussion forum about the power of global soccer is http://blogs-dev.oit.duke.edu/wcwp/. His current research focuses on his book on the history of the banjo, under contract with Harvard University Press, for which he received a National Humanities Center Fellowship and a Guggenhiem Fellowship this year.


  • Mark Anthony Neal

    Mark Anthony Neal, accomplished author of four books and one of the foremost scholars of Black popular culture in America. He is a professor of Black Popular Culture in the Department of African and African American Studies at Duke University. A frequent commentator for National Public Radio, Neal contributes to several on-line media outlets, including SeeingBlack.com, The Root.com and theGrio.com. He also writes the New Black Man website and is a national commentator on all forms of media.


  • Negar Mottahedeh

    Negar Mottahedeh, highly respected academic author. She received national notice for staging the first-ever Twitter Film Festival as well as for serving as a communications node in the Iranian election protests. She is an associate professor of literature at Duke University. Her blog is the Negarponti Files, and you can follow her on Twitter at http://twitter.com/negaratduke.


  • Tony O'Driscoll

    Tony O’Driscoll,
    author of “Learning in 3D: Adding a New Dimension to Enterprise Learning and Collaboration,” with Karl M. Kapp. He also also written articles in leading journals. O’Driscoll is a Professor of the Practice at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business, where he teaches, researches and consults in the areas of strategy, innovation and technology management. He has previously held leadership positions at IBM and Nortel Networks.

 

For more information about FutureWeb 2010 panel discussions, featured panelists and more, click here to navigate to the FutureWeb site. To register for the conference, visit the FutureWeb registration page.

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