Your Guide to Badging Events at DML 2013

HASTAC and the Badges for Lifelong Learning Competition grantees are off to Chicago and looking forward to sharing their badge systems at DML 2013: Democratic Futures. Attending in person? Follow the badging conversations happening at DML 2013 including Thursday's Badges for Lifelong Learning panel and 21st Century Science Fair, Ignite Sessions, DML Tech Cafe Sessions, and the Make-to-Learn Symposium on Wednesday.

For those following along online, we'll be using #dmlbadges on Twitter and the dmbadges tag here on HASTAC. 

Wednesday March 14, 1:30-230  in Sheraton Mississippi Room
The first panelist in this session is Badge Maker Learning

Kevin Miklasz, Iridescent

Leah Gilliam, Mozilla and Hive NYC Learning Network

Juan Rubio, GlobalKids

Badging started with the Boys/Girls Scouts to provide feedback on the effort kids had displayed towards gaining skills.  Becoming a Maker involves learning a variety of skills from the plethora of different kind of Maker activities.  Transferring the philosophy of the Scouts to motivate and reward students for learning Maker skill sets seems a natural step, but these badges often get implemented in digital form, like in the Instructables website featured at this symposium.  This raises many questions: are a nontangible, digital badge as effective as physical patches? What skills should be badged? Without a sash, where are the badges displayed?  And last, can Maker activities even benefit from badges, or are they interesting and good enough on their own?

The panel comprises several organizations in the NYC Hive who have been experimenting with educational badges in various contexts.  Each member will spend 5-10 minutes describing how they’ve tested badges in their programs and what they learned from the experience so far.  We will then open the floor for others to share their experiences with badges, and finally promote a round table discussion on the questions proposed above.

Thursday, March 14, 2:00 - 3:30 p.m., Sheraton Hotel
Badges for Lifelong Learning Panel

Cathy N. Davidson, HASTAC
Damian Ewens, Providence After School Alliance (PASA)
Chris McAvoy, Mozlla Foundation
Mitch Resnick, MIT Media Lab
Khal Shariff, Project Whitecard, NASA
Beth Swanson, Office of Mayor Rahm Emanuel
Connie Yowell, MacArthur Foundation

Thursday, March 14, 4:00 - 5:00 p.m. in Sheraton 4-5
Ignite Session

Thursday, March 14, 5:00 - 7:00 p.m in Sheraton
Explore, Create, Share: 21st Century Science Fair
Featuring more than 30 Badges for Lifelong Learning badge systems.

Saturday, March 16, at 11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m in Sheraton 4-5
DML Tech Cafe

Simeon Schnapper, Youtopia
Intuitive Learning Systems and 22nd Century Pedagogy

Table 5

Join Chicago's very own Youtopia.com for a journey into creating an OBI-compliant badge and or badge system using the same improvisational techniques that put Chicago's comedy theater scene on the map. It's a collaborative workshop where you'll learn to ""yes, and…"" your team members and play a fun improv game at each step of the process.


1. Introduction and discussion about what we should build as a team and why (Game: 10 Fingers)

2. Collaboration of final badge name and design (Game: Change 3)

3. What’s a challenge? Discussion and design. (Game: Digits)

4. Adding goals, activities, awards, and assigning points (Game: Syncro Clap)

5. Tracking and Assessment (Game: Group Choice)

6. Pushing to your backpack, sharing on social media, proof of the the pudding (Game: Danka)


Prerequisites: Open mind, naturally intuitive, sense of humor...


Karen Jeffrey, Forall Systems
Digital Badges for K-12 Students
Table 12

The goal of this presentation is to generate discussion at the DML Cafe as well as build a community for continued discussions around research and implementation of digital badges to design innovative, engaging and productive learning experiences for K-12 students in both formal and informal environments. This presentation will include hands on demonstrations of example badge system implementations.


Opportunities badges present: The use of digital badges to scaffold, assess and communicate learning in order to


* connect informal and formal learning environments,

* recognize skills that are not traditionally recognized,

* develop higher order thinking skills,

* foster independent learning upon individualized pathways,

* support reflection and planning in student learning,

* support communication between students, teachers and parents,

* leverage both interpersonal and intrapersonal intrinsic motivators such as challenge, curiosity, competition and recognition in order to stimulate deeper learning,

* incorporate best practices in assessment and pedagogy to design engaging and effective learning contexts,

* incorporate national and local academic benchmarks or standards to facilitate discussion and deeper understanding of pedagogies and strategies across learning environments and

* describe skill sets, competencies and proficiencies in a granular manner to ""unpack"" individuals' knowledge (and potential growth areas).


Challenges badges present: Considerations for implementing digital badges include how to


* integrate effectively into classroom learning environments,

* support teachers without creating an additional workload,

* work within technology limitations both at school and at home,

* avoid the pitfalls of external motivation,

* comply with COPPA and FERPA regulations,

* avoid the ""gold star"" effect whereby assessments do not assess true growth in learning,

* provide equitable technology access for students and

* make available appropriate professional development to teachers.


Join us at the DML Cafe and share your thoughts about how to take advantage of the opportunities and handle the challenges that badges create in learning environments for K-12 students.


Daniel Hickey, Indiana University
Digital Badges Design Principles Documentation Project
Table 16

The Design Principles Documentation Project is gathering the insights emerging from DML’s Badges for Lifelong Learning initiative. We are tracking the evolution of badge design practices as thirty DML awardees incorporate digital badges into diverse programs Our analysis of badging practices across these projects resulted in 20 general principles for recognizing, assessing, motivating, and evaluating learning. Our database and our presentation are organized these general badge design principles. Each of the twenty principles is linked back to specific practices and features from individual projects. For each principle, we are also creating a database of relevant research to help these projects and other innovators work more knowledgeably and eventually contribute to that knowledge.


Our poster will provide a quick overview of the twenty general badges design principles. Visitors will be able to peruse our growing database of principles, practices, and resources on our laptop computers. Visitors will also be able to speak with the project member responsible for documenting the principles, practices, and resources in each of the four areas. Because all of the DML badges projects will also be presenting at the Tech Cafés, visitors will be able speak with the innovators who are responsible for particular practices that they are interested in.


This event will initiate the second phase our project where we begin to make the principles, practices, and resources in our database available to the public, and invite others from outside of the DML competition to contribute to it.


Our poster will provide a quick overview of the twenty general badges design principles. Visitors will be able to peruse our database of principles, practices, and resources on our laptop computers. Visitors will also be able to speak with the project member responsible for documenting the principles, practices, and resources in each of the four areas. Because all of the DML badges projects will also be presenting at the Tech Café, visitors will be able speak with the innovators who are responsible for particular practices that they are interested in. This event will initiate the second phase our project where we begin to make the principles, practices, and resources in our database available to the public, and invite others from outside of the DML competition to contribute to it.


Paul Allison, New York City Writing Project
Youth Voices: A school-based social network with badges
Table 17

At our roundtable, we’ll discuss our work as teachers from local sites of the National Writing Project to turn a school-based social network, Youth Voices, into an ARG-like game, offering badges for to secondary school students for accomplishing tasks that are detailed on P2PU.


The object of “Play Youth Voices” is to become a social media power user through commenting on other players’ posts, responding to literary and informational texts, doing long-term research projects, composing, revising, and publishing with text and media, and becoming a self-directed learner.


Youth Voices is a site for conversations. We invite youth of all ages to voice their thoughts about their passions, to explain things they understand well, to wonder about things they have just begun to understand, and to share discussion posts with other young people using as many different genres and media as they can imagine!


Along with other National Writing Project teachers, we started Youth Voices in 2003 by merging several earlier blogging projects. We bring students together on this one site that lives beyond any particular class, because it’s easier for individual students to read and write about their own passions, to connect with other students, comment on each others work, and create multimedia posts for each other. Further, it's been exciting for us to pool our knowledge about curriculum and digital literacies.


Students publish multi-media, well-crafted products on Youth Voices, and we nurture, guide, and allow time for them to write comments and to develop conversations about each others discussion posts. Our mission is to be a place online where students from across the nation (and globally, when possible) can engage other young people in conversations about real issues that they see happening in the world. We want our students to be immersed in lively, voiced give-and-take with their peers.

Cliff Manning, Makewaves
90 minutes to connect the world - Design an Open Badge for International Collaboration
Table 24

Learning is now global and opportunities arise everywhere. Mozilla Open Badges enable learners to evidence and share their learning anytime anywhere.

Help us design a badge that supports and encourages youth to connect and collaborate internationally.


This hands on session is a chance to design an open badge, see examples of current projects from the UK and make connections with organisations and youth around the world.

We have 90 minutes to connect the world - help us to do it!


Saturday, March 16: 2:00-3:30pm
Designing with Teachers: Participatory Approaches to Professional Development in Education

Panelists: Karen Brennan, Laurel Felt, Antero Garcia, Dan Hickey, Sarah Kirn
Discussants: Erin Reilly & Ioana Literat

Session outline:      Introductions (5 minutes)
·         Erin and Ioana – intro to the PD Working Group and the publication (15 min)

o   Participatory learning

o   Genesis of the working group

o   Values

o   Principles

·         Panelist presentations on their work/case studies (10 min each = 50 min)  

o   Sarah Kirn

o   Antero Garcia

o   Karen Brennan

o   Laurel Felt

o   Dan Hickey (will include consideration of digital badges in participatory PD)

·         Conclusions and closing remarks (<5 min)

o   The value of interdisciplinary collaboration

o   Future plans and areas of research

·         Q&A (15 min)

Saturday, March 16, 4:00 - 5:00 p.m. in Sheraton 4-5
Ignite Session

  • Rebecca C. Itow, Participatory Assessment: Evaluate Reflections Rather Than Artifacts