First Year Course in Digital Media for a University Core Requirement

 

The course materials for the first year course in digital media below are intended for a university wide requirement.  I was asked to develop this course for the new university general education for lower division students.

 

Introduction to the Course Content and Information
The WSU catalog describes this course as “[I]nquiry into digital media, including origins, theories, forms, applications, and impact with a focus on authoring and critiquing multimodal texts. 3 credits; no pre-requisite.”  The course is categorized as a “Ways of Knowing,” under “ARTS” Inquiry in Creative and Professional Arts;” thus, it counts toward UCORE requirements for a degree at WSU.

Course Materials
• Course Packet from University Readers, (approximately $85.00); available for purchase online at http://www.universityreaders.com/.
• Class Website: http://dtc-wsuv.org/dtc101/
• Thumb/Flash Drive, $10; available at the Bookie or any grocery or electronics store

Learning Goals & Outcomes
This course is aimed to address four of the seven University Learning Goal.  These are:
• Critical and Creative Thinking
• Information Literacy
• Communication
• Diversity

Additionally, students who plan to major in Digital Technology & Culture on the Vancouver campus will also find that the course is keyed to eight of The CMDC’s goals as a way of preparing them to enter the CMDC program. These are:

Goal 1:  Demonstrate competency with computers for designing, distributing, researching, retrieving, and preserving digital works in various mediums for humane and effective human-computer interactions
A. Produce web pages and other digital interfaces and/or environments for effective and functional human-computer interactions
B. Employ web and other digital interfaces and/or environments that respond to specific audience needs, as well as usability and accessibility issues
C. Raise awareness of Fair Use and privacy and intellectual property issues as they apply to media objects
D. Learn various methods of researching for online information, such as databases, wikis, and websites, and of evaluating its credibility

Goal 2: Synthesize media forms for multimedia contexts
A. Organize multimedia for web pages and other digital interfaces and/or environments using various graphics, sound, and video authoring tools
B. Develop a multimedia project that incorporates various media objects, such as video, animation, sound, and still images.

Goal 4:  Understand the production and assessment of media objects
A. Understand basics of front end design as well as composition strategies for digital texts and environments
B. Demonstrate an overall understanding and utilization of appropriate textual content for various forms of interactive media
C. Produce and evaluate effective textual content that promotes interaction, functionality, and usability by different readers and needs.

Goal 6:  Question the way digital media functions in multiple cultural contexts
A. Examine the presentation of race, class, gender, and disabilities in digital media
B. Interpret images found on the web from a cultural context different from your own

Goal 7:  Recognize various forms of language processing and their implications for media authoring
A. Use digital media terminology and concepts, such as medium, media, multimedia, mass media, remediation, repurposing, translation, text, textuality, language, and code, appropriately in presentations and projects
B. Employ various types of texts, such as visual, auditory, kinetic, and kinesthetic texts, for appropriate mediums
C. Study, create, and critique digital text and its central role in human-computer interactions
D. Employ textual content in web pages and other digital interfaces or environments that respond to specific audience needs

Goal 8: Appreciate the history of technological development, from local to global perspectives, and its implications for a variety of mediums
A. Demonstrate understanding between digital and analog technologies
B. Compare and contrast technological development from a historical perspective

Goal 9:  Utilize an interdisciplinary perspective in order to understand the basics of social, economic, and education changes brought about by digital media
A. Demonstrate knowledge of “digital divide” by explaining the various factors leading to it in the US and beyond
B. Note the way in which public policies impact access to information
C. Create, and use information ethically

Goal 10: Be practiced and capable communicators in all mediums
A.  Create a digital text in a variety of mediums
B.  Construct and deliver an argument focusing on the way the medium affects the message, audience, and other rhetorical components
C. Evaluate the effective use of language in a digital text

Assignments
The course is divided into 13 modules, each focusing on a major theme or issue relating to digital media.  Students are expected to engage with the materials associated with each module and respond to them through in-class discussion as well as prompts via blog postings and peer review activities via Twitter.  Twice during the semester (mid-semester and at the end of the course) students are required to produce a major project aimed at helping them to synthesize information and develop a unique perspective on the subject. Thus, texts that students are assigned to research, read, and write in this course will consist of wide range of digital media objects and environments, including blogs and social media as well video, virtual reality, and multimedia installations, etc. 

• Thirteen (13) Responses to Prompts Activities
These are blog posts––referred to as a “Contextualizing Scholarship Activity”––that ask students to produce 250 word responses (with required citations from the texts) to prompts relating to the readings and multimedia assignments as a way of helping students to understand how to contextualize ideas within a body of knowledge. Technology required:  Students will be provided a Word Press blog, provided by The CMDC Program, where they will write, publish, and archive their work.

• Eleven (11) Peer Review Activities
These are a series of Twitter posts––referred to as a “Synthesizing Ideas Activity”––that ask students to respond to a peer’s blog post on the class’s Twitter site and receive feed back from the author of the blog post about the peer review comments made.  The activity is aimed at encouraging students to engage in a dialogue about their ideas on a public platform. Technology required:  Twitter account.

• Two (2) Major “Authoring” Projects
These are large production projects––referred to as an “Authoring Activity”––that ask students to demonstrate what they have learned about digital technology and culture by asking them to synthesize concepts, practice the theories and ideas encountered in the readings and online research activities and express methods and approaches used in the production of their work, both orally and in writing.

Assessment
To be successful in the course, students must 1) stay current with all of the required assignments that lead to completion of their projects, 2) participate in class activities, 3) attend all classes, 4) turn in all assignments on time.  Each assignment is worth the following amount:

Thirteen (13) Responses to Prompts Activities @ 2pts each = 26 pts.
Eleven (11) Peer Review Activities   @ 2pt. each = 22 pts.
Two (2) Major “Authoring” Projects   @ 16 pts. each = 32 pts.
Class Participation    @ 20 pts. = 20 pts.

Total Number of Points       100 pts.

Final grades will be calculated in this way:

94-100 A
90-93 A-
84-89 B
80-83 B-
74-79 C
70-73 C-
64-69 D
60-63 D-
>60 F

Attendance Policy
More than two unexcused absences will result in a final grade being lowered by one letter grade. Excused absences are defined as absences due to documented illnesses or deaths of close family members. Vacations, scheduled doctor visits, family reunions, weeklong getaways, forgetting the semester has already begun, or that we are meeting for class, do not count as excused absences. Students need to be in class on the days indicated in the Course Schedule. No exceptions. If students miss more than two weeks in a row, for any reason, students will be asked to drop the course and retake it when they are better able to participate.

University Policies
Academic integrity is the cornerstone of the university and will be strongly enforced in this course.  Any student found in violation of the academic integrity policy will be given an “F” for the course and will be referred to the Office of Student Conduct.  For additional information about WSU’s Academic Integrity policy/procedures please contact (360) 546-9573. 

Disability Accommodations may be available if students need them in order to fully participate in this class because of a disability. Accommodations may take some time to implement so it is critical that students contact Disability Services as soon as possible.  All accommodations must be approved through Disability Services, located in the Student Resource Center on the Lower Level of Student Services Center (360) 546-9138.

Emergency Notification System: WSU has made an emergency notification system available for faculty, students and staff. Please register at Zzusis with emergency contact information (cell, email, text, etc). Students may have been prompted to complete emergency contact information when registering for classes on RONet. In the event of a Building Evacuation, a map at each classroom entrance shows the evacuation point for each building. Please refer to it. Finally, in case of class cancellation campus-wide, please check local media, the WSU Vancouver web page and/or http://www.flashalert.net/. Individual class cancellations may be made at the discretion of the instructor. Each individual is expected to make the best decision for his or her personal circumstances, taking safety into account.  Safety plan website - http://safetyplan.vancouver.wsu.edu/

Important Dates and Deadlines: Students are encouraged to refer to the academic calendar often to be aware of critical deadlines throughout the semester.  The academic calendar can be found at www.registrar.wsu.edu/Registrar/Apps/AcadCal.ASPX.  Questions regarding the academic calendar can be directed to the Office of Student Affairs in VSSC 100 or call 360-546-9559.

 

Part 1: Digital Media & Intelligent Machines

Week 1 Theme:  Digital media as a field of study, as medium of production & expression

Day 1 Intro to digital technologies & computing devices

Introduce the course; inventory students’ technology knowledge; set up Word Press sites for “Contextualizing Scholarship Activity” (blog postings) and Twitter accounts for “Synthesizing Ideas Activity”; uploading documents to online folders; review teaching materials; discuss course requirements

Day 2 Digital media terminology, forms, & characteristics

Prepare for Today:
“Introduction to Digital Media:” http://dtc-wsuv.org/cmdc/dtc101/dtc101-intro-media.ppt

Day 3 Digital media as practice

Prepare for Today:
From The Language of New Media, by Lev Manovich.
Prologue, Introduction, & Ch. 1:  “What Is New Media?”

Homework for Next Week: Contextualizing Scholarship Activity (Prompt for Blog Posting Week #1):  Manovich lists 10 media objects.  Since the book’s publication in 2001, several new objects have emerged.  Using the slides as your reference, identify one, and connect it to the four characteristics he claims are typical of new media objects.  In other words, in what way is this media object digital? (250 words; cite from the reading; due by the beginning of the next class.)

This Week’s Multimedia:
The Man with a Movie Camera,” Dziga Vertov, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KytJFyMHZl0
Myst Online, http://mystonline.com/en/play/
Camille Utterback, http://camilleutterback.com/

Week 2 Theme:  The Development of Digital Media

Day 1 The rise of contemporary computing

Prepare for Today:
From The New Media Reader
Ch. 2:  “As We May Think,” by Vannevar Bush

Synthesizing Ideas Activity: Read and respond on Twitter to your classmate’s “Contextualizing Scholarship Activity” you are assigned.  Discuss the media object he or she identified.  Is it different than the one you chose?  Do you agree with their choice?  Using Manovich’s four characteristics, explain why or why not. Write and post three tweets that encapsulate your thoughts.

***Students will be assigned Project 1, due on xxxx. 
See http://dtc-wsuv.org/cmdc/dtc101/dtc101_project1.doc

Day 2 The rise of hypertext systems

Prepare for Today:
Literary Machines, by Theodor H. Nelson

Day 3 The rise of the web

“The Semantic Web,” by Tim Berners-Lee, http://mitworld.mit.edu/video/236

Homework for Next Week: Contextualizing Scholarship Activity (Prompt for Blog Posting Week #2): Look at this famous image from the film The Matrix and the video clip that experiments with recreating the “raining code” concept from the film, and explain how it visually represents the ideas raised in the readings for this week, particularly the relationship humans have with computers and information.  250 words; cite from the readings; due by the beginning of the next class.

This Week’s Multimedia:
Image from The Matrix,  http://dtc-wsuv.org/cmdc/dtc100/matrix.jpg

“Dream Scene Matrix,” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=plxCcu2Mm6Y&feature=related

 

Part 2: The Makeup & Lifespan of Digital Objects

Week 3 Theme:  Textuality

Day 1 Materiality, ephemerality, cloud computing

Prepare for Today:
“The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction,” by Walter Benjamin

Synthesizing Ideas Activity: Read and respond on Twitter to your classmate’s “Contextualizing Scholarship Activity” you are assigned.  Focus on the similarities and differences in the way you interpreted the image in reference to the readings. Write and post three tweets that encapsulate your thoughts.

Day 2 The future of the book

Prepare for Today:
“The End of Books,” by Robert Coover, http://www.nytimes.com/books/98/09/27/specials/coover-end.html
“The End of the End of the Book: Dead Books, Lively Margins, and Social Computing,” by Alan Liu

Day 3 Preservation, archiving, obsolescence

“Preserving Virtual Worlds Final Report,” by Matthew Kirschenbaum et al. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/17097

Homework for Next Week: Contextualizing Scholarship Activity (Prompt for Blog Posting Week #3): Watch the documentation video for Noah Waldrip-Fruin’s work, Screen, produced for the virtual environment at Brown University called a CAVE.  Discuss the way in which the work demonstrates the concepts of materiality, physicality, and corporality found in this week’s readings.  250 words; cite from the readings; due by the beginning of the next class.

This Week’s Multimedia:
Screen, by Noah Waldrip-Fruin, Noah, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WOwF5KD5BV4

 

Part 3: Expressive Systems

Week 4 Theme:  Text Technologies

 

Day 1 History of Writing Technologies

Prepare for Today:
From Avatars of the Word:  From Papyrus to Cyberspace, by James J. O’Donnell
Ch. 3:  “From the Codex Page to the Homepage”

Synthesizing Ideas Activity:  Read and respond on Twitter to your classmate’s “Contextualizing Scholarship Activity” you are assigned.  What did he or she say about the materiality, physicality, and corporality in relation to Screen do you agree with?  Disagree with? Develop three tweets that encapsulate your thoughts. Write and post three tweets that encapsulate your thoughts.

Day 2 The impact of the method by which we write on consciousness

Prepare for Today:
From Orality and Literacy:  The Technologizing of the Word, by Walter J. Ong
Ch. 4:  “Writing Restructures Consciousness”

Day 3 Remediation

Prepare for Today:
From Remediation:  Understanding New Media, by Jay David Bolter and Richard Grusin
Ch. 1:  “Immediacy, Hypermediacy, and Remediation”

Homework for Next Week: Contextualizing Scholarship Activity (Prompt for Blog Posting Week #4): Review the three multimedia texts in the order they appear and reflect on the changes you notice in the way the news is presented in 1990 and in 2008.  Then, discuss these changes, applying what you learned about remediation from Bolter and Grusin.  (250 words; cite from the readings; due by the beginning of the next class.)

This Week’s Multimedia:
“ABC World News, February 16, 1990,” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tah-LgYOGm4
“Netscape Interface circa 1995,” http://dtc-wsuv.org/cmdc/dtc100/netscape-interface-1995.jpg
“Barack Obama, Oprah Winfrey . . . on CNN,” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vcfnB0B1vrY
Week 5 Theme: Freedom of Expression

Day 1 Remixes and mashups

Prepare for Today:
From Remixthebook!, by Mark Amerika
“Play All the Remixes––An Introduction”

Synthesizing Ideas Activity: Read and respond on Twitter to your classmate’s “Contextualizing Scholarship Activity” you are assigned.  In what whys did his or her interpretation of the materials differ from yours?  What new insights did you learn from this perspective? Write and post three tweets that encapsulate your thoughts.

Day 2 Challenges & responses to freedom of human expression (Fair Use & Copyright Laws)

Prepare for Today:
From Remixthebook!, by Mark Amerika
Ch. 1:  “Source Material Everywhere––The Alfred North Whitehead Remix”

Day 3 Challenges & responses to freedom of human expression (Fair Use & Copyright Laws)

Prepare for Today:
“The Hacker Ethic,” by Grzegorz Adam Hankiewicz, http://gradha.sdf-eu.org/textos/hacker_ethic.en.html
“Copyright.”  United States Copyright Office, http://www.copyright.gov/
“Creative Commons,” http://creativecommons.org/

Homework for Next Week: Contextualizing Scholarship Activity (Prompt for Blog Posting Week #5): View the two videos you are assigned, and explain how they may or may not be legal in terms of Fair Use and U.S. copyright laws.  (250 words; cite from the readings; due by the beginning of the next class.)

This Week’s Multimedia:
“Star Wars Fan Film:  The Essence of the Force,” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XD3FyJU51kM
“Star Wars Saga (The Best Trance Remix Montage),” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B2qypl_Lzk4&feature=related
Week 6 Theme:  New Forms of Expression

Day 1 Definitions and descriptions of electronic literature

For Today:
“Electronic Literature:  What Is It?,” by N. Katherine Hayles

Synthesizing Ideas Activity:  Read and respond on Twitter to your classmate’s “Contextualizing Scholarship Activity” you are assigned.  What views do you share about the legality of the two videos?  Where do you differ in your views? Write and post three tweets that encapsulate your thoughts.

Day 2 Born digital literary works

Prepare for Today:
“Shy Boy,” by Thom Swiss, http://bailiwick.lib.uiowa.edu/swiss/shyboy/shyboy.html
“Cruising,” by Ingrid Ankerson and Megan Sapnar, http://collection.eliterature.org/1/works/ankerson_sapnar__cruising.html
“Ad Verbum,” by Nick Montfort, http://nickm.com/if/adverbum_web.html

Day 3 Multimedia/multimocal criticism

Prepare for Today:
From Close Reading New Media, by Jan Van Looy and Jan Baetens
“Introduction:  Close Reading Electronic Literature”

Homework for Next Week: Contextualizing Scholarship Activity (Prompt for Blog Posting Week #6): View the three electronic literature works.  Pick one and discuss how “is not print” (30) as Hayles claims.  In other words, what makes it an example of a “born digital” work?  (250 words; cite from the readings; due by the beginning of the next class.)

This Week’s Multimedia:
“Shy Boy,” by Thom Swiss, http://bailiwick.lib.uiowa.edu/swiss/shyboy/shyboy.html
“Cruising,” by Ingrid Ankerson and Megan Sapnar, http://collection.eliterature.org/1/works/ankerson_sapnar__cruising.html
“Ad Verbum,” by Nick Montfort, http://nickm.com/if/adverbum_web.html

 

Part 4: Thinking Critically about Multimodal Texts

Week 7 Midterm Projects & Oral Presentations

Day 1 Oral Presentations, part 1. See assignment sheet for Project 1: http://dtc-wsuv.org/cmdc/dtc101/project1.doc

Day 2 Oral Presentations, part 2. See assignment sheet for Project 1: http://dtc-wsuv.org/cmdc/dtc101/project1.doc

Week 8 Theme: Thinking Critically about Multimodal Texts

Day 1 Relationship between the medium and the message

Prepare for Today:
The Medium Is the Massage, by Marshall McLuhan and Quentin Fiore.

Day 2 Multimodal reading and writing, media specificity

Prepare for Today:
From Writing Machines, by N. Katherine Hayles
Ch. 2:  “Material Metaphors, Technotexts, and Media-Specific Analysis”

Day 3 Understanding digital images

Prepare for Today:
From How Images Think, by Ron Burnett
Ch. 1:  “Vantage Point and Image-Worlds”

Homework for Next Week: Contextualizing Scholarship Activity (Prompt for Blog Posting Week #8): Applying what you have learned about the way the medium affects the message and approaches to analyzing a text based on the medium used for presenting the information, analyze Donna Leishman’s interactive, gamelike work, “Redridinghood.”  Explain how the affordances of the electronic medium allow for new ways to tell a familiar story. (250 words; cite from the readings; due by the beginning of the next class.)

This Week’s Multimedia:
“McLuhan Remix:  Prologue 1/3,” by Kurt Weibers, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ts1y83E09d0
“Mediums,” by Dene Grigar, http://dtc-wsuv.org/cmdc/dtc100/mediums.jpg
“Redridinghood,” by Donna Leishman, http://collection.eliterature.org/1/works/leishman__redridinghood/index.htm

 

Part 5: Living with Digital Technologies

Week 9 Theme: Networked Culture

Day 1 Virtual culture

Prepare for Today:
Hello Avatar: Rise of the Networked Generation, by Beth Coleman; Foreword by Clay Shirky
Ch. 1

Synthesizing Ideas Activity:  Read and respond on Twitter to your classmate’s “Contextualizing Scholarship Activity” you are assigned. Compare his or her findings to yours.  What did he or she identify as an affordance that you did not mention in your paper?  What points did he or she make about the work that you may not have caught? Write and post three tweets that encapsulate your thoughts.

***Students will be assigned Project 1, due on xxxx. 
See http://dtc-wsuv.org/cmdc/dtc101/dtc101_project2.doc

Day 2 Social media culture

Prepare for Today:
From Here Comes Everybody:  The Power of Organizing without Organizations, by Clay Shirky
Ch. 3:   “Everyone Is a Media Outlet”

Day 3 Creating identity online

Ch. 4:  “Publish, Then Filter”

Homework for Next Week: Contextualizing Scholarship Activity (Prompt for Blog Posting Week #9): Looking over your Facebook page or Twitter site, or those of a friend or family member (if you do not have access to your own sites), discuss the ideas Coleman and Shirky talk about in their works.  In particular, focus on how they both argue that “media use changes the user” (Coleman). (250 words; cite from the readings; due by the beginning of the next class.)

This Week’s Multimedia:
Facebook, http://www.facebook.com
Twitter, http://twitter.com

Week 10 Theme: Technoculture

Day 1 Hackers

Prepare for Today:
Preface, and Ch. 1: “The Hacker Work Ethic,” by Pekka Himanen

Synthesizing Ideas Activity:  Read and respond on Twitter to your classmate’s “Contextualizing Scholarship Activity” you are assigned. Compare his or her findings to yours.  What did he or she identify as an affordance that you did not mention in your paper?  What points did he or she make about the work that you may not have caught? Write and post three tweets that encapsulate your thoughts.

Day 2 Cyborgs

Prepare for Today:
“The Cyborg Manifesto: Science, Technology, and Socialist-Feminism in the Late Twentieth Century,” by Donna Haraway, http://www.stanford.edu/dept/HPS/Haraway/CyborgManifesto.html

Day 3 Gamers & game culture

“The Bad News and Good News of Obsessive Video Games, Part 1,” by Richard O. Jones, http://blackvoicenews.com/more-sections/8-commentary/40464-the-bad-news-...

Homework for Next Week: Contextualizing Scholarship Activity (Prompt for Blog Posting Week #10): Compare the sentiments of freedom and power proclaimed in the two manifestos with the way in which stereotyping occurs in digital media.  In light of this irony, create a manifesto of your own that captures your own views about one of the following: 1) gamer culture, 2) online racial stereotyping, 3) the freedom of online information. (250 words; cite from the readings; due by the beginning of the next class.)

This Week’s Multimedia:
“Grand Theft Auto:  San Andreas” trailer, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u_CbHrBbHNQ
“Racism in Games,” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D8XZ3y5jBYY&feature=fvst
“The Hacker Manifesto,” http://www.mithral.com/~beberg/manifesto.html
“Borg,” http://dtc-wsuv.org/cmdc/dtc100/borg.jpg
“Borg Queen,” http://dtc-wsuv.org/cmdc/dtc100/borg-queen.jpg

Week 11 Theme: Online Communities

Day 1 Social media & crowdsourcing

Prepare for Today:
From Share This! How You Will Change the World with Social Networking, by Deanna Zandt
Ch. 1:  “The Power of Sharing”
Ch. 2:  “Are We There Yet?”
Ch. 3:  “We Are What You Share”

Synthesizing Ideas Activity:  Read and respond on Twitter to your classmate’s “Contextualizing Scholarship Activity” you are assigned. What is the focus of his or her manifesto?  Explain the ways in which he or she makes the point clearly and cogently, or not.  Discuss its compelling quality:  Do you find yourself agreeing with him or her?  Why or why not? Write and post three tweets that encapsulate your thoughts.

Day 2 The impact of friends and followers

Prepare for Today:
“The Role of Friends’ Appearance and Behavior on Evaluations of Individuals on Facebook: Are We Known by the Company We Keep?,” by Joseph Walther et al

Day 3 Social media & activism

Prepare for Today:
From LGBT Identity and Online New Media, by Christopher Pullen and Margaret Cooper
Ch. 6:  “The Facebook Revolution:  LGBT Identity and Activism” 
“Media and the Arab Uprising of 2011,” by Simon Cottle, http://tinyurl.com/4y4n6lk

Homework for Next Week: Contextualizing Scholarship Activity (Prompt for Blog Posting Week #11): Based on your readings, how are social media environments able to mobilize people to seek social change? What characteristics and quality do they possess that bring people together?  (250 words; cite from the readings; due by the beginning of the next class.)

This Week’s Multimedia:
“Occupy Global Map,” by Nicole Buckner et al, http://tinyurl.com/44uwx6b
“Occupy Wall Street, “ from Mother Jones,” http://motherjones.com/politics/2011/10/occupy-wall-street-protest-map

 

Part 6:  The Connectivity of Media

Week 12 Theme: Convergent & distributed media

Day 1 Transmedia, integrated media, & media convergence

Prepare for Today:
From Convergence Culture:  Where Old and New Media Collide,” by Henry Jenkins
Ch. 3:  “Searching for the Origami Unicorn:  The Matrix and Transmedia Storytelling”
“Convergence? I Diverge,” by Henry Jenkins, http://web.mit.edu/cms/People/henry3/converge.pdf

Synthesizing Ideas Activity:  Read and respond on Twitter to your classmate’s “Contextualizing Scholarship Activity” you are assigned. Compare your findings with his or hers and discuss the views that you shared; discuss ideas that you did not agree on. Write and post three tweets that encapsulate your thoughts.

Day 2 Mobile media, mapping, & tagging

Prepare for Today:
From Mobile Interface Theory:  Embodied Space and Locative Media, by Jason Farman
Ch. 1:  “Embodiment and the Mobile Interface”
Ch. 2:  Mapping and Representations of Space”

Day 3 Locative media

Prepare for Today:
Can You See Me Now?,” by Blast Theory, http://www.blasttheory.co.uk/bt/work_cysmn.html

Homework for Next Week: Contextualizing Scholarship Activity (Prompt for Blog Posting Week #12): Choosing either transmedia or locative media, and answer these questions:  In what ways are the works representing your topic examples of both convergent and distributed media? What makes it so? (250 words; cite from the readings; due by the beginning of the next class.)

This Week’s Multimedia:
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, part 2,” http://harrypotter.ea.com/
“Can You See Me Now?,” by Blast Theory, http://www.blasttheory.co.uk/bt/work_cysmn.html
“Citicube,” by Reed Rotondo and Ross Swanson, http://www.vancouverwalkingmap.com/

Week 13 Structure, Analytics, and Online Research

Day 1 Information architecture

Prepare for Today:
From Everything is Miscellaneous: The Power of the New Digital Disorder, by David Weinberger.
Ch. 1:  “The New Order of Order”
Ch. 2:  “Alphabetization and Its Discontents”

Synthesizing Ideas Activity:  Read and respond on Twitter to your classmate’s “Contextualizing Scholarship Activity” you are assigned. What did you learn about transmedia or locative media from the paper that you did not know before?  What did you learn that you can share with the paper’s author? Write and post three tweets that encapsulate your thoughts.

Day 2 Search engines

Prepare for Today:
“Evaluating Search Engines by Modeling the Relationship between Relevance and Clicks,” by Ben Carterette and Rosie Jones

Day 3 Discoverability

Prepare for Today:
“#26––The Myth of Discoverability,” by Scott Berkun, http://www.scottberkun.com/essays/26-the-myth-of-discoverability/
“The Next Generation of Discovery,” by Judy Luther and Maureen C. Kelly, http://www.libraryjournal.com/lj/home/889250-264/the_next_generation_of_...

Homework for Next Week: Contextualizing Scholarship Activity (Prompt for Blog Posting Week #13): Search the term “locative art” in Wikipedia, Leonardo Electronic Almanac, and “WorldCat” in WSU’s Library Database; read the document, “Evaluating Information Found on the Internet,” and answer these questions:  What kind of information does each site provide?  What are the differences?  How credible is the information of each site?  Why?  Write about you learn about researching on the web and the credibility of online information. (250 words; cite from the readings; due by the beginning of the next class.)

This Week’s Multimedia:
“Search Engine Optimization Chart,” by Martha Cruz Gabriel, http://dtc-wsuv.org/cmdc/dtc100/seo.pdf
“Google Analytics,” http://www.google.com/analytics/
Johns Hopkins U, “Evaluating Information Found on the Internet,” http://guides.library.jhu.edu/content.php?pid=198142&sid=1657614
Leonardo Electronic Almanac, http://leoalmanac.org/

 

Part 7: Media and the Public
Week 14 Theme: Access

Day 1 Net neutrality

Prepare for Today:
“Net Neutrality,” by NY Times, Retrieved on October 22, 2011, http://topics.nytimes.com/topics/reference/timestopics/subjects/n/net_ne...
From Media Ownership and Concentration in America, by Eli M. Noam.
Ch. 12:  The Internet:  Still Wide Open and Competitive?”

Synthesizing Ideas Activity:  Read and respond on Twitter to your classmate’s “Contextualizing Scholarship Activity” you are assigned. How did your I-search differ from his or hers?  What may have caused the different results? Write and post three tweets that encapsulate your thoughts.

Day 2 The Digital divide

Prepare for Today:
From Virtual Inequality:  Beyond the Digital Divide, by Karen Mossberger and Caroline J. Tolbert
Ch. 1:  “Redefining the Digital Divide”
From Crossing the Digital Divide:  Race, Writing, and Technology in the Classroom, by Barbara Monroe
Ch. 1:  “Reconsidering the Terms of the Debate”

Cybertyping

Prepare for Today:
From Digitizing Race:  Visual Cultures of the Internet, by Lisa Nakamura.
Ch. 2:  “Alllookthesame?  Mediating Visual Cultures of Race on the Web” 

Homework for Next Week: Contextualizing Scholarship Activity (Prompt for Blog Posting Week #14): Go one full day without using a desktop computer or smart phone.  Keep a journal about your experiences.  What changes in your life when you can access digital media?  How does this correlate to those who never have or seldom have access to computers and computing devices?  How would they go about finding a job?  Housing?  Doing homework? (250 words; cite from the readings; due by the beginning of the next class.)

This Week’s Multimedia:
“The Digital Divide,” by Scottnordq, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qz7dw3pLr-U
“Net Neutrality 101,” by Save the Internet, http://www.savetheinternet.com/net-neutrality-101
Week 15:   Prepare for final projects

Day 1: One on one tutorials with students about their work.
Day 2: One on one tutorials with students about their work. 
Week 16:  Final projects due

See Project 2 handout: http://dtc-wsuv.org/cmdc/dtc101/project2.doc