Blogs

HASTAC’s mission is shaped by the active participation and interests of our members. Whether authoring one of your own blog entries, commenting on someone else’s, or just lurking and learning, blogs are one of the primary ways to interact with, strengthen, and fully engage the HASTAC network. Below you will find recent blog entries, as well as some curated entries selected by HASTAC staff. You can also easily track the latest comments and see what blog posts are generating the most discussion. Via the buttons in the sidebar, you will also find HASTAC’s own Cathy Davidson’s “Cat in the Stack” blog, as well as “Where are the Now” the official blog of the Digital Media and Learning Competition winners.

HASTAC’s mission is shaped by the active participation and interests of our members. Whether authoring one of your own blog entries, commenting on someone else’s, or just lurking and learning, blogs are one of the primary ways to interact with, strengthen, and fully engage the HASTAC network. Below you will find recent blog entries, as well as some curated entries selected by HASTAC staff. You can also easily track the latest comments and see what blog posts are generating the most discussion. Via the buttons in the sidebar, you will also find HASTAC’s own Cathy Davidson’s “Cat in the Stack” blog, as well as “Where are the Now” the official blog of the Digital Media and Learning Competition winners.

I’m new to this blogging thing. Why do you want to hear from me?
Diversity is the lifeblood of HASTAC. The HASTAC membership comprises people from all walks of life and backgrounds with disparate areas of interest and specialization--from junior and senior scholars in the academy, to public intellectuals and citizen journalists in the community, to students and educators, to gamers and IT specialists, to artists. Everyone brings their own different knowledge and perspectives to an issue or discussion. From these differences can come synergy and innovation. This “collaboration by difference” is HASTAC’s guiding method, but it requires your unique voice. Join the conversation.


What should I write about?
A blog can be a quickly jotted sentence or a long, carefully constructed argument or anything in between. Share some interesting news that might have crossed your inbox; discuss what you are currently working on; highlight recent developments in your field; provide or solicit feedback or give advice to others; or simply share your opinion on issues big and small.


What are those icons under the member pictures?
Member badges are a quick, visual tool that give information about members and their relationship to the larger HASTAC community. The golden haystack icon indicates a member of the HASTAC staff; the DML icon indicates a Digital Media and Learning Competition winner; the orange and grey colored bars icon indicates how active the user is--the more orange bars you have the more content you have posted; the graduation cap icon indicates a HASTAC Scholar.

Highlighted

Amanda Starling Gould-img-7/18/2014 - 1:18pm
ScholarRegular contributor
Blog entry
By amanda starling gould on Jul 12th, 2014
This is the third post in my summer project to blog my progress as I move through the online HTML course I am taking through the Women's Coding Collective (WCC). In my pre-course post, I mentioned my motives, my sponsors, my initial likes & dislikes, and, in the open...
superadmin-img-4/25/2014 - 5:00pm
Super contributor
Blog entry
By HASTAC Admin on Apr 25th, 2014
Original press release posted on Organization of American States.  OAS Co-Organizes Sixth International Conference of the Humanities, Arts Science and Technology Alliance and Collaboratory in Peru  April 24, 2014 The Organization of American States...
superadmin-img-4/11/2014 - 2:01pm
Lurker
Blog entry
By Kathi Inman Berens on Jan 23rd, 2014
Center for Scholarly Technology conducted an interdisciplinary pilot to discern disciplinary differences in the application of "flipped" classroom techniques.  A three-week unit was "flipped" in three courses: an engineering lecture, a sociology lecture, and a gender...
herrcafe-img-3/13/2014 - 12:36am
HASTAC ContentContributor
Blog entry
By Marco Bastos on Mar 5th, 2014
Last December we compared the geographic distribution of HASTAC user base and commenters and confirmed that language was a major factor governing the geographic distribution of users, with commenters based mostly in English speaking locations and areas where English is...

Recent Posts

ScholarLurker
By Evan Buswell on Oct 21st, 2014
Scholars
There's a lot of these intros, so I'll try and be concise. My research focuses around the interaction between sociality and epistemology; hence on...
ScholarLurker
By Carolyn Jong on Oct 21st, 2014
Scholars
Hi everyone, I'm Carolyn, a PhD student in the Humanities program at Concordia University. I study online videogame modding communities, and am also...
ltagliaferri-img-10/21/2014 - 7:08pm
HASTAC ContentScholarRegular contributor
By Lisa Tagliaferri on Oct 21st, 2014
We are very happy to announce that we have a new member of the Futures Initiative and HASTAC@CUNY team, Shawn(ta) Smith-Cruz, who will be our...
ScholarMember
By Laura Perrings on Oct 21st, 2014
Scholars
1
Hello fellow HASTAC Scholars!I am very much looking forward to our work this year! In order to introduce myself, I'll introduce my DH projects. ...

Recent Comments

Tiffany Chan's picture
By Tiffany Chan on Oct 22nd, 2014
Thanks for your comment, Maddy. Your research with 3D modelling also sounds fascinating.Perhaps you have seen/read this before, but UCL has a chapter...
Joe Beckmann's picture
By Joe Beckmann on Oct 21st, 2014
The weakness of traditional Western and Asian classrooms, schools, colleges, and universities is when they DO presume student minds are "empty...
jessemenn's picture
By Jesse Menn on Oct 21st, 2014
Laura -- this sounds incredibly labor intensive. Proofing OCR texts is a pain, but also setting up each as proper TEI seems an enormous amount of...
moshucao's picture
By Shucao Mo on Oct 21st, 2014
 In traditional Western and Asian classrooms, students participate in adult-run classrooms where the assumption is that students' minds are like...